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Page 1 of 9, showing 10 records out of 82 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

George Washington Brown

Medlar

A photograph of George Washington Brown, who in the autumn of 1854 moved to Lawrence, Kansas Territory where he settled with a group of New England emigrants. By October of that year he had constructed a building and became editor of one of the first free-state newspapers in the territory, the Herald of Freedom, the organ of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The newspaper angered the proslavery forces in the territory. On May 21, 1856, a proslavery posse led by the notorious Douglas County sheriff, Samuel J. Jones arrested Brown and sacked and burned Lawrence. Brown spent four months incarcerated following an indictment by a proslavery grand jury for high treason. Later his case was dismissed without trial for want of cause for prosecution. He returned to Lawrence to rebuild his business and resume the publication of the Herald of Freedom. In the capacity of editor he served until the last issue of the newspaper on December 17, 1859. Brown?s interests included the founding of the city of Emporia and oil. In 1860 Brown drilled three wells in Miami County and began to extract oil. He finally decided to leave Kansas in 1865 for the more lucrative oil fields of Pennsylvania. His stay in Pennsylvania was brief, however, and by the end of the year he had journeyed to Rockford, Illinois, where he decided to take up permanent residence. Brown died there on February 5, 1915, at the age of ninety-four.

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Topeka statehouse press corps with Governor Mike Hayden

This is a photograph showing Governor Mike Hayden with members of the statehouse press corps. The photograph was taken when Governor Hayden was leaving office.

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George Washington Brown

A portrait of George Washington Brown, who in the autumn of 1854 moved to Lawrence, Kansas Territory where he settled with a group of New England emigrants. By October of that year he had constructed a building and became editor of one of the first free-state newspapers in the territory, the Herald of Freedom, the organ of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The newspaper angered the proslavery forces in the territory. On May 21, 1856, a proslavery posse led by the notorious Douglas County sheriff, Samuel J. Jones arrested Brown and sacked and burned Lawrence. Brown spent four months incarcerated following an indictment by a proslavery grand jury for high treason. Later his case was dismissed without trial for want of cause for prosecution. He returned to Lawrence to rebuild his business and resume the publication of the Herald of Freedom. In the capacity of editor he served until the last issue of the newspaper on December 17, 1859. Brown?s interests included the founding of the city of Emporia and oil. In 1860 Brown drilled three wells in Miami County and began to extract oil. He finally decided to leave Kansas in 1865 for the more lucrative oil fields of Pennsylvania. His stay in Pennsylvania was brief, however, and by the end of the year he had journeyed to Rockford, Illinois, where he decided to take up permanent residence. Brown died there on February 5, 1915, at the age of ninety-four.

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Men [and women] of Kansas

Topeka Capital

This volume is a collection of portraits of Kansas business owners, professionals, public officials, and politicians in 1905. Despite its title, this volume does include women also. The women included are physicians, osteopaths, and educators. The professions covered include: educators, clergy, lawyers, bankers, real estate, life insurance, lodge officials, architects, postmasters, physicians, dentists, artists, telephones, utilities, merchants, manufacturers, osteopathy, U.S. marshals, government officials, editors and publishers, railroads, military, and photographers. A name index begins on page 633 and it is also reproduced under Text Version below.

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James Redpath

James Redpath came to Kansas Territory as a reporter for the "New York Tribune," but he soon became a participant in the free state cause. He was involved with abolitionist John Brown and wrote a biography of Brown ("The Public Life of Capt. John Brown, by James Redpath, with an Auto-Biography of His Childhood and Youth by John") that was published in 1860. Redpath reported on the free state movement in Topeka, Kansas Territory.

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George Washington Brown to Eli Thayer

Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915

George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. G. W. Brown described the sack of Lawrence and the destruction of his printing press, commented upon the harshness of his prison conditions, and asked Eli Thayer to do anything in his power to help secure his release.

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Arthur Capper

An informal portrait of Kansas Governor Arthur Capper, 1865-1951, signing the "Bone Dry Law" passed by the Kansas Legislature. The law prohibited possession of liquor within the state and ended direct shipments of liquor to Kansas from out-of-state vendors. Capper, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor from 1915 to 1919, and as a U. S. Senator from 1919 to 1949.

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Topeka statehouse press corps with Governor Robert Bennett

This is a photograph showing Governor Robert Bennett posed with members of the statehouse press corps. The photograph was taken when Governor Robert Bennett was leaving office.

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William Allen White

Portrait of William Allen white, editor and owner of the Emporia Gazette newspaper, Emporia, Kansas.

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James Redpath

Packard

Portrait of James Redpath, who came to Kansas Territory as a reporter for the New York Tribune, but he soon became a participant in the free state cause. He was involved with John Brown and wrote a biography on him that was published in 1860. He reported on the free state movement in Topeka.

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