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Page 1 of 5, showing 10 records out of 47 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

George Washington Brown

Medlar

A photograph of George Washington Brown, who in the autumn of 1854 moved to Lawrence, Kansas Territory where he settled with a group of New England emigrants. By October of that year he had constructed a building and became editor of one of the first free-state newspapers in the territory, the Herald of Freedom, the organ of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The newspaper angered the proslavery forces in the territory. On May 21, 1856, a proslavery posse led by the notorious Douglas County sheriff, Samuel J. Jones arrested Brown and sacked and burned Lawrence. Brown spent four months incarcerated following an indictment by a proslavery grand jury for high treason. Later his case was dismissed without trial for want of cause for prosecution. He returned to Lawrence to rebuild his business and resume the publication of the Herald of Freedom. In the capacity of editor he served until the last issue of the newspaper on December 17, 1859. Brown?s interests included the founding of the city of Emporia and oil. In 1860 Brown drilled three wells in Miami County and began to extract oil. He finally decided to leave Kansas in 1865 for the more lucrative oil fields of Pennsylvania. His stay in Pennsylvania was brief, however, and by the end of the year he had journeyed to Rockford, Illinois, where he decided to take up permanent residence. Brown died there on February 5, 1915, at the age of ninety-four.

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Topeka statehouse press corps with Governor Mike Hayden

This is a photograph showing Governor Mike Hayden with members of the statehouse press corps. The photograph was taken when Governor Hayden was leaving office.

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George Washington Brown

A portrait of George Washington Brown, who in the autumn of 1854 moved to Lawrence, Kansas Territory where he settled with a group of New England emigrants. By October of that year he had constructed a building and became editor of one of the first free-state newspapers in the territory, the Herald of Freedom, the organ of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The newspaper angered the proslavery forces in the territory. On May 21, 1856, a proslavery posse led by the notorious Douglas County sheriff, Samuel J. Jones arrested Brown and sacked and burned Lawrence. Brown spent four months incarcerated following an indictment by a proslavery grand jury for high treason. Later his case was dismissed without trial for want of cause for prosecution. He returned to Lawrence to rebuild his business and resume the publication of the Herald of Freedom. In the capacity of editor he served until the last issue of the newspaper on December 17, 1859. Brown?s interests included the founding of the city of Emporia and oil. In 1860 Brown drilled three wells in Miami County and began to extract oil. He finally decided to leave Kansas in 1865 for the more lucrative oil fields of Pennsylvania. His stay in Pennsylvania was brief, however, and by the end of the year he had journeyed to Rockford, Illinois, where he decided to take up permanent residence. Brown died there on February 5, 1915, at the age of ninety-four.

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Arthur Capper

An informal portrait of Kansas Governor Arthur Capper, 1865-1951, signing the "Bone Dry Law" passed by the Kansas Legislature. The law prohibited possession of liquor within the state and ended direct shipments of liquor to Kansas from out-of-state vendors. Capper, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor from 1915 to 1919, and as a U. S. Senator from 1919 to 1949.

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Topeka statehouse press corps with Governor Robert Bennett

This is a photograph showing Governor Robert Bennett posed with members of the statehouse press corps. The photograph was taken when Governor Robert Bennett was leaving office.

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William Allen White

Portrait of William Allen white, editor and owner of the Emporia Gazette newspaper, Emporia, Kansas.

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William Hutchinson

Clinedinst

A portrait of William Hutchinson, a journalist and correspondent for the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, St. Louis Democrat and Washington Republic, he covered events in Kansas from 1855 through the early 1860s. He settled in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Hutchinson served as secretary of the Kansas Central Committee and assisted with efforts to send emigrant parties and relief to Kansas Territory. He was first identified with the abolition or free-soil party, until the Republican party organized. Hutchinson was a member of the Wyandotte Constitution Convention and was an early and persistent advocate of temperance and other reforms.

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Samuel Forster Tappan

A portrait of Samuel Forster Tappan, who was born in Massachusetts and came to Kansas when he was in his twenties. He listed his occupation as a journalist but was best known as secretary at the Leavenworth and Wyandotte Constitutional conventions. He was a free state supporter and settled in Lawrence. This image was taken a number of years after the territorial era.

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Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Snyder

A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women?s suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer?s Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women?s voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.

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Edward Russell

This is a portrait of Edward Russell, a newspaperman and politician. He came to Kansas Territory in 1856, and located in Elwood, in Doniphan County, Kansas. Shortly after moving to Kansas, Russell started a newspaper that espoused the free-state side. In August, 1858, he lobbied Doniphan county citizens against the Lecompton Constitution. In that same year, Russell, D. W. Wilder and others founded a free-state paper. Russell later served in the Kansas legislature, and held several state offices.

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