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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Men [and women] of Kansas

Topeka Capital

This volume is a collection of portraits of Kansas business owners, professionals, public officials, and politicians in 1905. Despite its title, this volume does include women also. The women included are physicians, osteopaths, and educators. The professions covered include: educators, clergy, lawyers, bankers, real estate, life insurance, lodge officials, architects, postmasters, physicians, dentists, artists, telephones, utilities, merchants, manufacturers, osteopathy, U.S. marshals, government officials, editors and publishers, railroads, military, and photographers. A name index begins on page 633 and it is also reproduced under Text Version below.

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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William Addison Phillips

Portrait of William Addison Phillips, an author, lawyer, journalist and politician. In 1857, Phillips attended the Constitution Convention at Topeka and the Free State Conventions at Centropolis, Lawrence, and Grasshopper Falls. He founded the town of Salina in April, 1858. In that same month and year, Phillips was nominated at the Topeka Free-State Convention under the Leavenworth Constitution to serve as a supreme court judge. He attended the Convention at Osawatomie and the Republican State Convention at Lawrence in 1859. Phillips served in the Kansas Volunteer Regiments and rose to the rank of colonel. From March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875 Phillips was an at large representative to the United States Congress and from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1879 he represented the First District.

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William Bolden Townsend

This illustration shows William Bolden Townsend, (1854-?), taken from I. Garland Penn's book "The Afro-American Press". Townsend born into slavery ,in 1854, near Huntsville, Alabama overcame his humble beginnings to become an accomplished journalist, and lawyer. At the age of six he migrated to Kansas, in 1860, with his mother to receive a "common school education". On the completion of his education, Townsend became a teacher and taught for a brief period in Mississippi before returning to his adopted state. By 1876, he was a correspondent for the "The Colored Citizen" at Fort Scott, Kansas and associate editor, in 1878, to "The Radical" at Leavenworth, Kansas. In addition to his career as a journalist, Townsend held a number of county and state appointed offices and was active in the Republican party before he entered law school, in 1889, at the University of Kansas. When he received his degree, in 1891, Townsend established a law practice in Leavenworth County but the radical tension in the community became so dangerous that he feared for his safety and eventually left Kansas.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Kansas Governor Walter Augustus Huxman, (1937-1939), signing a bill to legalize the sale of 3.2 beer. People in the photograph are (left to right): Milt Tabor, Topeka Capitol reporter; Samuel Terbovich, Huxman's pardon attorney; unidentified man; Lew Larkin, Kansas City Journal-Post reporter; Gil Mayo, Associated Press; and Max (last name unknown).

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

In this rather lengthy letter from his home in Sumner, Ingalls commented on many different facets of his personal and professional life to date in Kansas Territory and about his prospects for the future; these included his law practice (now mostly in Atchison), his interest in journalism and politics, and his interest in a variety of speculative opportunities. The future of Kansas looked good to Ingalls, despite continued problems with drought that was forcing many to sell out.

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James S. Emery

Bowman, photographer,

James Stanley Emery had a law practice in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. He was associated with the New England Emigrant Aid Company and worked as a journalist for the "New York Daily Times." He was involved in numerous free state activities both in Kansas Territory and in the East.

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Nelson Case

Romig, Robert W.

This sepia colored photograph shows Nelson Case, (1845-1921). Case a graduate from the University of Michigan settled, in May of 1869, in Oswego, Kansas to practice civil and criminal law. Considered an honest and honorable lawyer among his peers, Case was appointed, in June of 1880, by Governor St. John as a probate judge. He was twice re-elected to the bench but didn't seek a third term. Case soon returned to practicing law and crusading for prohibition. A long time supporter of the temperance movement, he successfully banished saloons from the town of Oswego and rallied for the constitutional amendment of prohibition. Actively involved the community, Case served as the city attorney of Oswego and the editor of the Oswego Independent newspaper. He was also a member of the Republican Party, and was appointed to the board of regents at the state normal school in Emporia. In his spare time, he authored a number of books including "The History of Labette County" and "The Constitutional History of the United States".

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Nelson Case

This sepia colored portrait shows Nelson Case, (1845-1921). Case a graduate from the University of Michigan settled in the town of Oswego, Kansas, in May of 1869, to practice civil and criminal law. Considered an honest and honorable lawyer among his peers, Case was appointed in June of 1880 by Governor St. John as a probate judge. He was twice re-elected to the bench but did not seek a third term. Case soon returned to practicing law and advocating for prohibition. A long time supporter of the temperance movement, he successfully banished saloons from the town of Oswego and rallied for the constitutional amendment of prohibition. Actively involved in his community, Case held a number of elected and appointed positions. He served as the city attorney of Oswego, and the editor of the Oswego Independent newspaper. Case was also a member of the Republican Party, and was appointed to the board of regents at the State Normal school in Emporia. In his spare time, he authored a number of books including "The History of Labette County" and "The Constitutional History of the United States."

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Nelson Case

This black and white photograph shows Nelson Case, (1845-1921). Case a graduate of the University of Michigan settled in the town of Oswego, Kansas, in May 1869, to practice civil and criminal law. Considered an honest and honorable lawyer among his peers, Case was appointed a probate judge in June 1880, by Governor St. John. He was twice re-elected to the bench, but didn't seek a third term. Case soon returned to practicing law and crusading for prohibition. A long time supporter of the temperance movement, Case successfully banished saloons from the town of Oswego and rallied for the constitutional amendment of prohibition. Actively involved in the community, he held a number of elected and appointed positions. Case served as the city attorney of Oswego and was the editor of the Oswego Independent newspaper. He was also a member of the Republican Party, and was appointed to the Board of Regents at the State Normal School in Emporia. In his spare time, he authored a number of books including "The History of Labette County" and "The Constitutional History of the United States".

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