Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Journalists (Remove)
Government and Politics -- Political Parties (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Type of Material -- Photographs (Remove)
Date (Remove)
Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 27 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Arthur Capper

An informal portrait of Kansas Governor Arthur Capper, 1865-1951, signing the "Bone Dry Law" passed by the Kansas Legislature. The law prohibited possession of liquor within the state and ended direct shipments of liquor to Kansas from out-of-state vendors. Capper, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor from 1915 to 1919, and as a U. S. Senator from 1919 to 1949.

previewthumb

William Hutchinson

Clinedinst

A portrait of William Hutchinson, a journalist and correspondent for the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, St. Louis Democrat and Washington Republic, he covered events in Kansas from 1855 through the early 1860s. He settled in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Hutchinson served as secretary of the Kansas Central Committee and assisted with efforts to send emigrant parties and relief to Kansas Territory. He was first identified with the abolition or free-soil party, until the Republican party organized. Hutchinson was a member of the Wyandotte Constitution Convention and was an early and persistent advocate of temperance and other reforms.

previewthumb

Samuel Forster Tappan

A portrait of Samuel Forster Tappan, who was born in Massachusetts and came to Kansas when he was in his twenties. He listed his occupation as a journalist but was best known as secretary at the Leavenworth and Wyandotte Constitutional conventions. He was a free state supporter and settled in Lawrence. This image was taken a number of years after the territorial era.

previewthumb

Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Snyder

A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women?s suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer?s Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women?s voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.

previewthumb

Edward Russell

This is a portrait of Edward Russell, a newspaperman and politician. He came to Kansas Territory in 1856, and located in Elwood, in Doniphan County, Kansas. Shortly after moving to Kansas, Russell started a newspaper that espoused the free-state side. In August, 1858, he lobbied Doniphan county citizens against the Lecompton Constitution. In that same year, Russell, D. W. Wilder and others founded a free-state paper. Russell later served in the Kansas legislature, and held several state offices.

previewthumb

William Addison Phillips

Portrait of William Addison Phillips, an author, lawyer, journalist and politician. In 1857, Phillips attended the Constitution Convention at Topeka and the Free State Conventions at Centropolis, Lawrence, and Grasshopper Falls. He founded the town of Salina in April, 1858. In that same month and year, Phillips was nominated at the Topeka Free-State Convention under the Leavenworth Constitution to serve as a supreme court judge. He attended the Convention at Osawatomie and the Republican State Convention at Lawrence in 1859. Phillips served in the Kansas Volunteer Regiments and rose to the rank of colonel. From March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875 Phillips was an at large representative to the United States Congress and from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1879 he represented the First District.

previewthumb

Jonathan McMillen Davis

This cabinet card shows the 22nd governor of Kansas Jonathan M. Davis.

previewthumb

William Bolden Townsend

This illustration shows William Bolden Townsend, (1854-?), taken from I. Garland Penn's book "The Afro-American Press". Townsend born into slavery ,in 1854, near Huntsville, Alabama overcame his humble beginnings to become an accomplished journalist, and lawyer. At the age of six he migrated to Kansas, in 1860, with his mother to receive a "common school education". On the completion of his education, Townsend became a teacher and taught for a brief period in Mississippi before returning to his adopted state. By 1876, he was a correspondent for the "The Colored Citizen" at Fort Scott, Kansas and associate editor, in 1878, to "The Radical" at Leavenworth, Kansas. In addition to his career as a journalist, Townsend held a number of county and state appointed offices and was active in the Republican party before he entered law school, in 1889, at the University of Kansas. When he received his degree, in 1891, Townsend established a law practice in Leavenworth County but the radical tension in the community became so dangerous that he feared for his safety and eventually left Kansas.

previewthumb

Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Kansas Governor Walter Augustus Huxman, (1937-1939), signing a bill to legalize the sale of 3.2 beer. People in the photograph are (left to right): Milt Tabor, Topeka Capitol reporter; Samuel Terbovich, Huxman's pardon attorney; unidentified man; Lew Larkin, Kansas City Journal-Post reporter; Gil Mayo, Associated Press; and Max (last name unknown).

previewthumb

Josiah Miller

Although born in South Carolina, Josiah Miller was a free state supporter. He attended college in Indiana and law school in New York. He came to Kansas in 1854 and on January 5, 1855, established the Kansas Free State newspaper in Lawrence. The newspaper office was destroyed by order of the territorial government on May 21, 1856 because is was deemed a nuisance. He was capturned by Buford's proslavery forces and was tried for treason against the state of South Carolina. He supported John C. Fremont. In 1857, he was elected probate judge of Douglas County, Kansas Territory.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3|