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Thematic Time Period -- Age of Reform, 1880 - 1917 (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
Government and Politics -- State Government (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Lawyers (Remove)
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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

The law and lawyers in Kansas history

Kansas State Historical Society

A collection of papers presented at the116th Annual Meeting of the Kansas State Historical Society on October 4 and 5, 1991. The essays cover four general themes: the law and the settlement process, the law as it relates to the liquor question, the history of the courts which have administered the law in Kansas, and women as attorneys and lawmakers.

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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George W. Espey to Governor John A. Martin

George W. Espey, an agent of the Palace Drug Store in Ashland, Kansas, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka asking whether he must quit selling alcohol because the county clerk does not have the proper affidavit form for him to fill out to renew his license. Espey asks for a prompt reply because the county attorney has stopped him from doing business.

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Frank H. Doster, Chief Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court, 1897-1903

Portrait of Frank H. Doster (b. 1847, d. 1933), who served as the Chief Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court from 1897 to 1903. He was part of the Populist movement in Kansas and later became a socialist.

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William Alfred Peffer

Leonard, J. H.

William Alfred Peffer was the first Populist senator elected to U.S. Congress. He was born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, on September 10, 1831. As a young man he traveled across the country, living in California, Indiana, Missouri, and Illinois. After the outbreak of Civil War, Peffer enlisted in the 83rd Illinois Infantry, entering as a private and working his way up to the rank of second lieutenant. He read law while still in the military, and after his discharge in 1865 he was admitted to the bar and began practicing law in Clarksville, Tennessee. Five years later he moved to Fredonia, Kansas, where he established another practice and edited the Fredonia Journal. Peffer served as a state senator from 1874 to 1876, and during his tenure he relocated to Coffeyville, Kansas, where he assumed editorial control of the Coffeyville Journal. Then, in 1881, he launched the Populist publication Kansas Farmer, one of his best-known contributions to this agrarian reform movement. Peffer was instrumental in the creation of the People?s (Populist) Party, serving as a Populist U.S. Senator from 1891 to 1897 and running again (unsuccessfully) for re-election in 1896. Two years later, he ran an unsuccessful campaign for Governor of Kansas, losing the election to Republican William Stanley. Peffer died in 1912 in Grenola, Kansas, at the age of 81.

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Samuel Austin Kingman

Portrait of Samuel Austin Kingman, Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court, 1861-1865 and Chief Justice, 1867-1876.

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Nathaniel F. Graves

Downing, George

This cabinet card shows Nathaniel F. Graves, a lawyer and farmer from Tonganoxie, Kansas. He served as Justice of the Peace and County Attorney of Leavenworth County. In 1896, he was elected, on the Populist ticket to the Kansas House of Representatives from the sixth district of Leavenworth, Kansas,1897-1898.

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