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Thematic Time Period -- Age of Reform, 1880 - 1917 (Remove)
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Page 1 of 1, showing 10 records out of 10 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Fred Stone

This is a photograph of Fred Stone as the Scarecrow in the Broadway show 'The Wizard of Oz', which is always associated with Kansas. He gained notoriety with this role and went on to become a popular actor on Broadway and in feature films. This photograph was copied from Fred Stone's autobiography Rolling Stone.

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Frederick Funston

A photograph showing General Frederick Funston with his wife Eda Blankhart Funston, seated at the piano, and two unidentified women at the Funston home in the Presidio of San Francisco, California

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Legless Andrews to Seat of G.A.R.

Andrews, Legless

Legless Andrews of Kansas City, Missouri, writes to the Kansas Department of the Grand Army of the Republic of Topeka, Kansas, concerning free attractions to be provided at the dedication ceremony of the Soldiers' Memorial Building in Topeka, May 27, 1914. Mr. Andrews describes himself as a legless airnaut [sic] and proposes to perform three balloon ascensions and parachute leaps for fifty dollars. He claims to be the only legless acrobat conducting such performances. This letter is significant for its documentation of the social history of disabled persons in the early twentieth century.

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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William Allen White

This is a photo of William Allen White's family at their cabin in Colorado. Son William Lindsay and daughter Mary Katherine are sitting on a horse with their mother, Sallie, standing next to them. As publisher and editor of the Emporia Gazette, White gained national fame with his editorial "What's the Matter with Kansas?" during the Populist era in the 1890s.

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Worrall's guitar school

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

In the 1850s, guitarist Henry Worrall published this popular guitar tutorial with W.C. Peters & Sons of Cincinnati, Ohio. By the 1880s, Worrall had acquired copyright to the publication and issued a reprint with the Oliver Ditson Company of Boston, Massachusetts. The tutorial includes instructions, exercises, and popular music for playing solo acoustic guitar. Special instructions for playing Worrall's celebrated "Sebastopol" are also included. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868, and remained there until his death in 1902.

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Carry Nation poster

F. M. Steves & Sons Printers

Large, rectangular color poster advertising an appearance by Carry Nation, a temperance advocate who gained notoriety by attacking saloons. Her activities began in Medicine Lodge, Kansas, in 1899. A hatchet was her symbol because she often used the tool to smash saloon fixtures. In Nation?s autobiography, The Use and Need of the Life of Carry A. Nation, she explained the genesis of this poster. While jailed in Topeka for smashing saloon fixtures in July 1901, Nation received a letter from James Furlong, manager of the Lyceum Theater in Rochester, New York. According to Nation, Furlong offered to bail her out of jail if she granted him some lecture dates. She agreed, was pardoned, and left almost immediately for a Chautauqua in Clarksburg, Ohio. Her lecture series continued across upstate New York.

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William Alfred Peffer

Leonard, J. H.

William Alfred Peffer was the first Populist senator elected to U.S. Congress. He was born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, on September 10, 1831. As a young man he traveled across the country, living in California, Indiana, Missouri, and Illinois. After the outbreak of Civil War, Peffer enlisted in the 83rd Illinois Infantry, entering as a private and working his way up to the rank of second lieutenant. He read law while still in the military, and after his discharge in 1865 he was admitted to the bar and began practicing law in Clarksville, Tennessee. Five years later he moved to Fredonia, Kansas, where he established another practice and edited the Fredonia Journal. Peffer served as a state senator from 1874 to 1876, and during his tenure he relocated to Coffeyville, Kansas, where he assumed editorial control of the Coffeyville Journal. Then, in 1881, he launched the Populist publication Kansas Farmer, one of his best-known contributions to this agrarian reform movement. Peffer was instrumental in the creation of the People?s (Populist) Party, serving as a Populist U.S. Senator from 1891 to 1897 and running again (unsuccessfully) for re-election in 1896. Two years later, he ran an unsuccessful campaign for Governor of Kansas, losing the election to Republican William Stanley. Peffer died in 1912 in Grenola, Kansas, at the age of 81.

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Mary Bartlett Pillsbury Weston

Mettner's Studio, Lawrence, Kansas

This cabinet card shows Mary Bartlett Pillsbury Weston, (1817-1894), a professional and accomplished artist from New Hampshire who moved in 1874 to reside in Lawrence, Kansas. She captured the essence of Kansas and its "promising future" in an oil painting entitled "The Spirit of Kansas". The painting was created for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois, and it carried the message of how culture and civilization brought peace and progress to the state.

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L. W. Halbe collection

Halbe, L. W. (Leslie Winfield), 1893-1981

The L. W. (Leslie Winfield) Halbe photo collection consists of 1500 glass plate negatives produced by Halbe during his teenage years. Halbe lived in Dorrance, Russell County, Kansas, and began taking photographs of the region with an inexpensive Sears and Roebuck camera when he was fifteen years old.

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