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Thematic Time Period -- Eisenhower Years, 1946 - 1961 (Remove)
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Page 1 of 1, showing 6 records out of 6 total, starting on record 1, ending on 6

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Alexander Braun oral history

Keckeisen, Sara J. (Sara Ellen Judge)

An oral interview with Alexander Braun conducted by Sara Keckeisen. He was born July 10, 1923 in Wernersdorf the Ukraine the son of Peter and Katharina (Braeul) Braun. After World War II, Mr. Braun fled west from the former Soviet Union. Eventually he immigrated to Canada (1949) on contract with the Canadian Government to work as a miner in Northern Quebec. After years of persistent attempts, in 1953 he was able to come to the United States from Kitchener, Ontario, Canada, to join his wife and her parents in Kansas. Alexander worked in auto body repair. He later was employed by the Kansas Neurological Institute (KNI) and the State of Kansas as a Master Electrician before his retirement in 1991. These are long clips. The first clip is sixty-three minutes, the second is seventy-three minutes. A searchable transcription of the interview is available by clicking on Text Version below.

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Anonymous resident to the governor's wife

An anonymous Kansas resident writes the wife of Governor John Anderson Jr. of Topeka concerning a proposed atheist colony near Stockton, Kansas. The author expresses her opposition to the colony and regards it as a plot of communist Russia. Madalyn Murray [O'Hair] of Baltimore, Maryland, proposed the colony after the Supreme Court decision in Murray v. Curlett (1963) declared prayer in schools unconstitutional. Ms. Murray formed Other Americans, Inc. (a Maryland corporation) to advance atheist interests and establish an atheist colony in Kansas. Carl Brown, a farmer near Stockton and former Kansas state senator, served as a director of that corporation. Mr. Brown, an avowed atheist, deeded 160 acres of land near Stockton to the corporation. During the 1950s and 1960s, the national debate over the role of religion in public life centered on the use of prayer in public schools. Many people associated atheists with communists and approached this issue from the larger context of the cold war. Historical Society staff removed the author's name and place of residence from this copy of the letter to comply with her request for privacy.

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Reception at the Nazareth Convent, Concordia, Kansas

This photo was taken on St. Joseph's Day during a reception at the Nazareth Convent, Sisters of St. Joseph, Concordia, Kansas. The group of young postulants are preparing to enter the chapel at the convent to celebrate accepting the habit of the Sisters of St. Joseph and becoming novitiates. A year later, again on St. Joseph's Day, they will celebrate their "first profession day" and take their vows. The girls on the steps in descending order are: Anna Herman, Julia Galen, Patricia McKenna, Marie Kelley; and Sisters Henrietta Bueche, Mildred Huber, Evangeline Thomas, Ovide Bertrand, Dympna Hamel, Elizabeth Belisle. Girls, left to right: Donna Rose Desilet, Connie Chaput, Ronalda Cote, Marcia Warthern, Anita Bissette.

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Interior views of the Kaw Mission, Council Grove, Kansas

Three views of the interior of Kaw Mission in Council Grove, Kansas. Kaw Mission was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 and now operates as Kaw Mission State Historic Site.

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Views of the Kaw Mission in Council Grove, Kansas

Several views of the Kaw Mission in Council Grove, Kansas. In 1846, a treaty with the Kaw (or Kansa) gave them a diminished reservation that included the site of present-day Council Grove. The treaty of 1846 had provided that the government would make an annual payment of $1,000 to advance the education of the Kaws in their own country. In 1850 the Methodist Episcopal Church South, which had ministered to the tribe since 1830, entered into a contract with the government, and construction of the mission and school building was completed by February 1851. School began in May under the direction of Thomas Sears Huffaker. Approximately 30 Kaw boys, aged 6 to 17 years, moved into the mission to live upstairs in four dormitory rooms. It was the goal of the Methodist Episcopal Church South to teach the boys academic subjects, farming, and Christianity at the Kaw Mission. Classes for Indian children were held until 1854, when the cost of maintaining the school was deemed too costly. The mission building and grounds were sold to Thomas Huffaker in 1865, and he continued in possession for 14 years. Thereafter, several individuals owned the property until 1926 when Carl I. Huffaker, one of Thomas' sons, bought the land on which the mission building stands. In 1951 the Kansas Legislature authorized the purchase of the mission property from Huffaker, and the Kansas Historical Society as trustee for the state. Kaw Mission was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 and now operates as Kaw Mission State Historic Site.

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Views of the Kaw Mission in Council Grove, Kansas

Several views of the Kaw Mission in Council Grove, Kansas. Kaw Mission was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 and now operates as Kaw Mission State Historic Site.

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