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Thematic Time Period -- Eisenhower Years, 1946 - 1961 (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Lawyers (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 1 of 1, showing 10 records out of 10 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Charles D. Stough

This black and white photograph shows Charles D. Stough, (1914-1995). Born in Mound Valley, Kansas and a graduate from the University of Kansas Law School. He began his career practicing law in Chicago, Illinois and latter in Lawrence, Kansas before enlisting at the age of twenty-eight, in the U.S. Navy. After his honorable discharge, Stough made a successful bid in 1946 for a political office to the Kansas House of Representatives where he served four regular sessions as a Republican from the Eleventh District. He was also majority leader from 1951 to 1953 and speaker of the house from 1953 to 1954. Stough did not seek re-election in 1954, but continued to serve in a number of key political posts at the local, state and national levels. On December 8, 1995 just two days after observing his eighty-first birthday, Charles Stough passed away.

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Andrew Frank Schoeppel

Andrew Schoeppel, United States Senator from Kansas, with Richard Milhous Nixon, Vice President of the United States, and Dwight David Eisenhower, President of the United States.

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Elisha J. Scott

Elisha J. Scott, 1890-1963, was raised in Topeka's Tennesseetown. As a youth, he possessed a strong drive and a quick wit, which attracted the eye of prominent Topeka minister Charles M. Sheldon. With financial support from Sheldon and his own abilities to succeed, Scott earned his law degree from Washburn College in 1916. During his long career as an attorney, he argued many civil rights and school segregation cases throughout Kansas and the Midwest. Two of Scott's sons, John and Charles, joined him in his law firm of Scott, Scott, Scott, and Jackson. Together they helped to prosecute, at the local level, the landmark civil rights case of Brown v. Topeka Board of Education.

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Earl Thomas Reynolds to Governor Fred Hall

Reynolds, Earl Thomas

This letter was written by Earl Thomas Reynolds, a lawyer in Coffeyville, Kansas, to Governor Fred Hall. Reynolds was concerned that black people in Kansas were not receiving adequate patronage and political party representation in or by the Republican Party, particularly in the third district. Mr Reynolds inquired why should blacks continue to support the Republican Party, at all levels of government, if their support is not rewarded by the party.

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75,000 Legionnaires capture New York

Illustrated Current News, Inc.

These are picturegrams from the American Legion Convention in New York in 1952. "As some 3 million New Yorkers cheer their lagging footsteps, the delegates to the American Legion Convention, West Point Cadets, many bands, etc., parade on Fifth Ave. for 9 1/2 hours." 1. A zany 'Leapin Lena' gives the crowd a lot of laughs. 2. Presidential candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Harry W. Colmery, march with the Kansas delegation. 3. Claude Buzich, Minneapolis, gives a reluctant policeman a great big kiss.

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Paul E. Wilson to T. Justin Moore

Wilson, Paul E

In this letter, assistant attorney general Paul Wilson responded to T. Justin Moore?s query about the desegregation case Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. Wilson writes that he is not fully informed of the current situation in Topeka, but that he believes the school board is beginning the integration process in anticipation of the court?s ruling that segregation is unconstitutional. He also mentioned that some contracts for African-American teachers had not been renewed because the board felt that many white parents would not want their children to be taught by black teachers. Wilson was a defense attorney for the Topeka school board and he argued their case before the Supreme Court. On May 17, 1954, Chief Justice Earl Warren handed down the ruling that segregated educational facilities were indeed unconstitutional.

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Albert McDonald Cole

This black and white photograph shows Albert McDonald Cole. A lawyer and a county attorney from Jackson County, Kansas. Cole began his political career, in 1941, when he was elected to the Kansas Senate as a representative for the counties of Atchison and Jackson. He served in the legislature until 1945 before successfully being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Kansas' first congressional district, (1945-1953). In his 1952 bid for re-election, Cole was narrowly defeated but the loss was attributed to his support for the construction of the Tuttle Creek Dam. After his career in Kansas politics came to a close, Cole later served during the Eisenhower adminsitration as Administrator of the Housing and Home Finance Agency (1953-1959). From 1959 to-1961, he served as vice president of Reynolds Aluminum Service Corp. and president of Reynolds Metals Development Corp.(1961-1967).

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Kenneth Gaines interview, Columbia, South Carolina

Gaines, Kenneth

This transcript of an interview with Kenneth Gaines is part of an oral history project entitled "Patterns of Change, Edwards County, Kansas 1950-1970" conducted by the Kinsley Public Library. The project was supported by a Kansas Humanities Council Heritage Grant. Gaines talks of his family, education, and his memories of the Edwards County community.

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Sally Frame interview, Kinsley, Kansas

Frame, Sally Josena (Wilson)

This transcript of an interview with Sally Frame is part of an oral history project entitled "Patterns of Change, Edwards County, Kansas 1950-1970" conducted by the Kinsley Public Library. The project was supported by a Kansas Humanities Council Heritage Grant. Frame talks of her family, education, and her memories of the Edwards County community.

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Frederick (Fred) Lee Hall

Photograph of Frederick (Fred) Lee Hall (1916-1970) sitting at his desk when he was governor of Kansas from 1955 to 1957. He resigned on January 3, 1957 to accept an appointment to the Kansas Supreme Court.

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