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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 40 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

The Plumb Plan of Government Ownership of Railroads

Howe, Frederic Clemson, 1867-1940

Trade union broadside announcement advertising the meeting place of a talk to discuss a proposed plan of government and employee ownership over the railroad industry. Mr. Frederick C.Howe delivered the talk at the City Auditorium, Wednesday Evening, August 13 at 8 O'clock. The exact date and city is unknown, though it may have taken place in Topeka.

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John Palmer Usher

This black and white photograph shows John Palmer Usher (1816-1889). A lawyer from Indiana and a member of President Abraham Lincoln's cabinet. Usher served only two years as the seventh U.S. Secretary of the Interior, (1863-1865), before returning to private life. In 1865, he become the chief counsel for the Kansas Pacific Railroad a position he held until his retirement in 1880. Usher also resumed his political career when he moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1872, and was elected to serve one term as the town's mayor (1879 to 1881). On April 13, 1889, at the age of 73, Usher died at the University Hospital in Philadelphia after a lengthy illness. Burial was at Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Williard Davis

Mullen

This cabinet card shows Willard Davis, who served as Kansas' 10th Attorney General from January 8, 1877 to January 10, 1881. He was born January 26, 1837 in Madison County, Kentucky. He attended Missouri University, then studied law at Lexington, Kentucky, and was admitted to practice there. When the war began, he was commissioned into the Union army as a Lieutenant in the Thirty-First Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, but his military career was brief due to failing health. On March 14, 1863, Davis was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as the Internal Revenue Collector for Kentucky. He held the position until September 1, 1866 when he was dismissed for failure to accept President Andrew Johnson's policies. Davis resumed his law career and advocated for civil rights for freed slaves. In the fall of 1870, Davis moved to Neosho Falls, Kansas and became the attorney for the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. The following year he settled in Parsons, Kansas and was elected the town's first mayor. To focus on his political career, he resigned from the railroad in 1873. In 1874, he was elected county attorney for Labette County, Kansas. He held this office until he was elected in 1876 to serve as Attorney General for the State of Kansas. After two terms he returned to his private law practice. On December 6, 1885 at the age of forty-eight, he passed away after a lengthy illness at his home at Eleventh and Van Buren Street in Topeka, Kansas.

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Six gun to 61

Kansas. Centennial Commission

This film by the Kansas Centennial Commission commemorates 100 years of Kansas statehood with an overview of Kansas history. The twenty-five minute film begins with the Louisiana Purchase and ends with President Eisenhower's speech in Abilene, Kansas, in 1959. The film was produced by the University of Kansas Television-Film Center with assistance from the Kansas Historical Society, and it was written and directed by Robert D. Brooks and J. William Walker.

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William Howard Taft campaigning for President, Newton, Kansas

This sepia colored photograph shows William Howard Taft, the Republican candidate for the U.S. Presidency, speaking to the crowd at the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company depot in Newton, Kansas. Standing to the left of Taft is the U.S. Senator from Kansas Charles Curtis. Taft won the November election by defeating the Democratic candidate William Jennings Bryan to become the twenty-seventh President of the United States.

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Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding economic conditions in town. Chadwick asked that Hill promptly pay his debt to Abelard Guthrie, a fellow Quindaro investor, who was on the brink of bankruptcy. He added that Clinton County, Missouri, had voted not to invest in the Parkville and Grand River Railroad that fall, which had damaged the possibility for a boom in economic activity for the coming fall. Chadwick reported that heavy rains had hindered transportation on local rivers, but was optimistic that October might bring some money to the town through land sales. No news had been heard from Causin, the Washington attorney who was assisting Hill to retain some disputed lands.

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Alfred Mossman Landon and family

Wolfe, Harold B., 1898-1966

This photograph represents Alfred Mossman Landon and his family, Theo, Nancy and Joe. The family along with others are standing in front of steam locomotive at the Kansas State Fair in Hutchinson, Kansas while he was governor.

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William Allen White arrest clippings

Topeka Journal

This collection of newspaper clippings recounts William Allen White's defiance of the Kansas governor and Court of Industrial Relations with his public support for striking railroad workers which ultimately led to his arrest. White was editor and owner of the Emporia Gazette newspaper, Emporia, Kansas.

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Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Thomas Ewing, Sr.

Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896

Among other rather mundane items, Ewing told his father back in Ohio that the Democrats had just held a convention at Tecumseh, "which Hugh [Ewing] and Hamp attended," and about the economic conditions in Leavenworth, which were much tied to the success of the "Pikes Peak movement."

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G. B. Woodford to Governor John Martin

Woodward, C.B.

In this letter, the local authorities of Labette County, Kansas, plead with Kansas governor John Martin for militia support to preserve order in Parsons during the railroad strike of 1886. In February 1885, railroad shop workers walked off the job because of a cut in pay and reduced hours of work. Governor Martin was able to negotiate a settlement to the strike but problems continued throughout Kansas, Missouri, and Texas.

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