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Page 1 of 293, showing 10 records out of 2922 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

General J. Lane's house, Lawrence, Kansas. 323 miles west of St. Louis, Mo.

Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882

THis stereograph showing James Henry Lane's house, Lawrence, Kansas. The Kansas River and the town of Lawrence are visible in the background. It is from Alexander Gardner's series, Across the Continent on the Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division.

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Marshall Marcellus Murdock

Portrait of Marshall Marcellus Murdock, 1837-1908, a newspaperman, founder of the Wichita Eagle, and State Senator.

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John Pierce St. John, Kansas Governor

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

Sketch of John Pierce St. John's inauguration at the Kansas Statehouse on January 13, 1879. This was the first public inauguration of a Kansas governor. The sketch was drawn by Henry Worrall and published in "Harper's Weekly", February 8, 1879.

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Georgia Neese Clark Gray

A formal portrait of Georgia Neese Clark Gray, 1900-1995, of Richland, Kansas. Gray was National Committeewoman for the Democratic Party, 1936-1964, and was appointed by President Harry S. Truman on June 9, 1949 as the first woman to serve as the U. S. Treasurer, 1949-1953.

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Arthur Capper

An informal portrait of Kansas Governor Arthur Capper, 1865-1951, signing the "Bone Dry Law" passed by the Kansas Legislature. The law prohibited possession of liquor within the state and ended direct shipments of liquor to Kansas from out-of-state vendors. Capper, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor from 1915 to 1919, and as a U. S. Senator from 1919 to 1949.

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok

This formal portrait take in Hays, Kansas shows James Butler " Wild Bill" Hickok, 1837-1876. The legendary lawman and gun-slinger begins his career in 1858 as peace officer of the Monticello Township in the Kansas Territory of Johnson County. For a number of years Hickok also works as a government scout, guide and deputy U.S. marshal across the Great Plains. His reputation as a skilled marksman proceeds him wherever he went. In 1869 Hickok is elected marshal of Hays, Kansas and sheriff of Ellis County, Kansas. A role he serves until 1870. In 1871, he is hired as Abilene, Kansas' town marshal. As marshal he earns fame for being a quick draw and for spending most of his time playing cards. Hickok is killed on August 01, 1876 while playing a game of poker at a saloon in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory.

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Susanna Madora Salter

A formal portrait of Susanna Madora Salter, 1860-1961, and her husband, Lewis Salter in 1880, during the first year of their marriage. Born March 2, 1860, in Belmont County, Ohio, Susanna Madora Kinsey moved to a Kansas farm with her parents in 1872. Eight years later, while attending the Kansas State Agricultural College, she met and married Lewis Salter. The couple soon moved to Argonia where she cared for their young children and became an officer in the local Woman's Christian Temperance Union. Nominated on the Prohibition Party ticket by several Argonia men as a joke, Salter surprised the group and received two-thirds of the votes. She was elected in April 4, 1887, just weeks after Kansas women had gained the right to vote in city elections. The 27-year-old woman knew more about politics than her detractors realized. She was the daughter of the town's first mayor. Her father-in-law, Melville J. Salter, was a former Kansas lieutenant governor. Although she apparently performed her job well, Salter never sought another elected office. Within a few years, the Salters moved to Oklahoma where the nation's first woman mayor died in 1961 at the age of 101.

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Richard E. Hickock

Kansas State Penitentiary

An inmate photograph of Richard Hickock copied from his Kansas State Prison inmate file. Hickock and his accomplice, Perry Smith, were convicted of first degree murder for the brutal 1959 killings of Herb and Bonnie Clutter, their daughter, Nancy, and son, Kenyon, in Holcomb, Kansas. The murders inspired the true-crime novel "In Cold Blood" by Truman Capote.

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok

Blakeslee, W.

This studio portrait shows James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok in buckskins ,1837-1876. The legendary lawman and gun-slinger begins his career in 1858 as peace officer of the Monticello Township in the Kansas Territory of Johnson County. For a number of years Hickok also works as a government scout, guide and deputy U.S. marshal across the Great Plains. His reputation as a skilled marksman proceeded him wherever he went. In 1869 Hickok is elected marshal of Hays, Kansas and sheriff of Ellis County, Kansas. A role he serves until 1870. In 1871, he is hired as Abilene, Kansas' town marshal. As marshal he earns fame for being a quick draw and for spending most of his time playing cards. Hickok is killed on August 01, 1876 while playing a game of poker at a saloon in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory.

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Theodore Roosevelt at Baldwin, Kansas

Bridwell, Arthur

This is a photograph of Theodore Roosevelt, William Allen White, Henry J. Allen, Joseph Bristow, and Osmon Grant Markham standing on the back of a passenger car at the Baldwin, Kansas railroad station.

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