Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Places -- Counties (Remove)
Community Life (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 1 of 114, showing 10 records out of 1134 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Lawson Wilson to Lewis Allen Alderson

These three letters are from Lawson Wilson in Lincoln County, North Carolina, to his friend, Lewis Allen Alderson, a student at the University of Ohio in Athens. In his letters, Wilson reminisces about time spent in Athens and seeks news about his old acquaintances. Wilson states that "Nullification has been making a great noise in the South," regarding the ability of individual states to abolish federal laws, particularly relating to tariffs and slave laws in South Carolina. He also mentions that the gold mines in the region are making "a great bustle" and congratulates Alderson on his recent marriage. Alderson moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

previewthumb

C. G. Taylor to Lewis Allen Alderson

These two letters were written to Lewis Allen Alderson by his friend C. G. Taylor. In one of the letters, Taylor addresses Alderson's sister, Belinda C. Miles. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

previewthumb

Fern Gayden

This is a photograph of Fern Gayden possibly taken in Dunlap, Kansas. Fern Gayden was born September 29, 1904, in Dunlap, Kansas, where she attended elementary and secondary schools. She went on to attend Kansas State Teachers College at Emporia and taught school for one year. Fern Gayden moved to Chicago at the age of 23. She had a 50-year career as a social worker but became best known as a literary, fine arts, and political activist. A founding member of the South Side Writers Group in the 1930s, Fern Gayden's long and diverse career included leadership roles in the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and the South Side Community Art Center. During World War II, she co-published Negro Story magazine with Alice Browning.

previewthumb

Lone Pine

Coy Avon Seward

Black and white intaglio print on paper, depicting a single pine tree in a rocky terrain. The artist was Coy Avon Seward (1884-1939), born in Chase, Kansas, and trained at both Washburn and Bethany colleges. Seward was a founding member of the Prairie Print Makers Association. This group believed art should be affordable for all people. Seward inscribed this print to the donor, Virginia McArthur of Hutchinson, who saw Seward produce the print in 1934.

previewthumb

Menninger staff meeting, Topeka, Kansas

Seven staff members are shown in a team meeting discussing ways to diagnose and treat patients in the Menninger Clinic. This clinic was created to care for individuals with mood, personality, anxiety and addictive disorders, as well as teaching mental health professionals and advancing mental healthcare through research.

previewthumb

Charles Arbuckle to Lewis Allen Alderson

These four letters are from Charles Arbuckle to Lewis Allen Alderson. Arbuckle writes from Alderson's hometown of Lewisburg, West Virginia. In the letters, Arbuckle encourages Alderson to propose to Miss Lucy B. Miles, whom Alderson marries the day after he graduates from the University of Ohio in 1832. Arbuckle states that "an amiable woman next to religion is man's greatest consolation" but he seeks to remain a bachelor himself. Arbuckle also attended the Staunton Convention leading up to the election of 1832. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

previewthumb

Professional library at the Menninger Clinic, Topeka, Kansas

A woman is shown by the display of professional journals at the Menninger Professional Library. The library subscribed to about 400 journals in the various disciplines employed by the Menninger Clinic. This clinic was created to care for individuals with mood, personality, anxiety and addictive disorders, as well as teaching mental health professionals and advancing mental healthcare through research.

previewthumb

Isabel Erickson, Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas

Isabel Erickson attended the Menninger School of Psychiatric Nursing. She is shown in her nurse's uniform, cap and cape. The Menninger Clinic was created to care for individuals with mood, personality, anxiety and addictive disorders, as well as teaching mental health professionals and advancing mental healthcare through research.

previewthumb

Fire Station no. 4, Topeka, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows a horse drawn fire wagon in front of Fire Station No., 4 located near 8th and Clay in Topeka, Kansas. The men gathered around the wagon have been identified from left to right as: Will Hall, C. McCabe, Captain A.M. Robinson and E.L. Robinson.

previewthumb

Garfield School, Topeka, Kansas

Three black and white photographs of Garfield School in Topeka, Kansas, serving as an emergency hospital, possibly during the Spanish Influenza epidemic.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Places -- Counties

Community Life

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Collections

Curriculum

Date

Education

Environment

Government and Politics

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

People

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation

Type of Material