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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 29 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Kansas circa '90

Pierce, Jeff

This film depicts the life a young boy in Kansas in the 1890s. Filmed in the old Kansas Historical Society museum, the film portrays a dentist, photographer, blacksmith, and printer, and addresses the Kansas statehouse, Dodge City and cow towns, railroad expansion, the mechanization of agriculture, public schools, coal mining, salt mining, labor organizations, the Dalton Gang, Populism, and a diphtheria epidemic. The film was produced by The Junior League of Topeka, Inc.; The Channel 11 Club of Topeka; and the Extramural Independent Study Center, Division of Continuing Education, University of Kansas. The film was copyrighted by the University of Kansas and is provided by permission.

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School scenes, Finney County, Kansas

These two photographs picture Miss Downey and Ben Tullot in front of a school house.

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Shoe Shop School scene, Finney County, Kansas

Maude Elliott explains on the back of the photograph how the chuck wagon she was using as a school progressed into a shoe shop in Garden City. When the new district was opened, the wagon was hitched behind a pair of mules who drew it to the new school location. Maude Elliott was supposed to get a new school house, but unfortunately the new school building was still unfinished by the time she left.

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Spirit of Washington, Washington School, Topeka, Kansas

Thompson, Joseph A.

This silent film documents a day at Washington School, a Black elementary school located at 1025 Washington, Topeka, Kansas. The film follows each grade level through various activities throughout the day. Washington was one of four Black elementary schools in Topeka prior to the the U. S. Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. The Board of Education (1954) that called for the desegregation of public schools.

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Henry L. Denison to Joseph Denison

Denison, Henry

Henry Denison wrote from Bluemont College in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to his uncle Joseph Denison, a Trustee of the College. Henry informed him that dry summer conditions had significantly impeded crop growth. The drought also affected the construction of the College, as the plasterers depended on the water supply of a nearby creek to mix their plaster; carpenters, however, moved forward with their work. Henry closed with a mention of a recent eclipse.

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Pharmacy class at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas

This photograph shows a pharmacy class at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas. Dean Lucius E. Sayre, who founded and led the School of Pharmacy from 1885 to 1925, is seated fourth from the right. There are fourteen students visible in the class picture, including two women. Cases filled with bottles of chemicals and pharmacy supplies are visible in the background.

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June Chapman with students

This is a view of teacher June Chapman with two of her Tennessee Town Kindergarten students in Topeka, Kansas. This was the kindergarten for African American children sponsored by the Central Congregational Church, Topeka, Kansas. Dr. Charles Monroe Sheldon started the kindergarten in 1893 and served as pastor of the church from 1889-1920.

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School in a chuck wagon, Finney County, Kansas

This photograph shows Maude Elliott's first school building; it was used as a chuck wagon where two or three women cooked for a crew of men. The tent was their "living room" which could be as easily moved from place to place as the chuck wagon. A pair of mules was all that was needed to move Maude Elliott's school building around.

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Edward B. Smythe to Hiram Hill

Smythe, Edward B.

Edward Smythe wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding his experiences in Manhattan. Smythe described his journey West and his newly established lumber business. He found the people of Manhattan to be enjoyable and prosperous. Smythe illustrated their character by describing the ladies' festival planned for the coming week, in which funds will be raised to defray the expenses of constructing a beautiful new schoolhouse. He added that he would now begin his search for a "better half".

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Ephraim Nute to Amos Adams Lawrence

Nute, Ephraim

Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts, regarding the subject of a college. A well-attended town meeting had been held in which the idea had been discussed, though all seemed only "a castle in the air" but for Lawrence's "liberal offer" (presumably of funding) which was the "first step toward the realization of his project." The general opinion of the people was that the college should be constructed outside the town limits "on the high prairie or table land." Nute also mentioned the steps being taken to establish free public schools in the city, of upper and lower grades.

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