Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Places -- Counties (Remove)
Government and Politics (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 1 of 89, showing 10 records out of 882 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John Alexander Martin, governor of Kansas

This black and white photograph shows the tenth Governor of Kansas John Alexander Martin on the steps of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas with state office employees.

previewthumb

Governor Andrew Shoeppel doctor shortage correspondence

Kansas. Governor (1943-1947 : Schoeppel)

This correspondence between Governor Schoeppel and various individuals, including Senator Arthur Capper, addresses the serious shortage of medical doctors in Kansas in the later summer of 1945. Because of the urgent need for trained medical personnel during World War II, thousands of doctors either joined the military or worked in military-run facilities. As a result, many states found themselves lacking the medical personnel that they needed to take care of the civilians not directly involved in fighting the war.

previewthumb

Lawson Wilson to Lewis Allen Alderson

These three letters are from Lawson Wilson in Lincoln County, North Carolina, to his friend, Lewis Allen Alderson, a student at the University of Ohio in Athens. In his letters, Wilson reminisces about time spent in Athens and seeks news about his old acquaintances. Wilson states that "Nullification has been making a great noise in the South," regarding the ability of individual states to abolish federal laws, particularly relating to tariffs and slave laws in South Carolina. He also mentions that the gold mines in the region are making "a great bustle" and congratulates Alderson on his recent marriage. Alderson moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

previewthumb

Roland Boynton

A photograph of Roland Boynton, who was Kansas Attorney General from December 1, 1930 to January 14, 1935. Roland was a Republican from Emporia, Kansas. Roland Elmer Boynton was born May 29, 1891 in Manitou, Colorado. He attended the University of Kansas, receiving Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Law degrees. He served in World War I and after the war he served two terms as Lyon County Attorney. From 1928 to 1930 he served as Assistant Attorney General. When William A. Smith resigned to become a Kansas Supreme Court Justice in 1930, Mr. Boynton became the 27th Attorney General. After his term ended, Roland Boynton became the attorney for the Cities Service Gas Company. He died February 7, 1942 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma.

previewthumb

Fern Gayden

This is a photograph of Fern Gayden possibly taken in Dunlap, Kansas. Fern Gayden was born September 29, 1904, in Dunlap, Kansas, where she attended elementary and secondary schools. She went on to attend Kansas State Teachers College at Emporia and taught school for one year. Fern Gayden moved to Chicago at the age of 23. She had a 50-year career as a social worker but became best known as a literary, fine arts, and political activist. A founding member of the South Side Writers Group in the 1930s, Fern Gayden's long and diverse career included leadership roles in the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and the South Side Community Art Center. During World War II, she co-published Negro Story magazine with Alice Browning.

previewthumb

Charles Arbuckle to Lewis Allen Alderson

These four letters are from Charles Arbuckle to Lewis Allen Alderson. Arbuckle writes from Alderson's hometown of Lewisburg, West Virginia. In the letters, Arbuckle encourages Alderson to propose to Miss Lucy B. Miles, whom Alderson marries the day after he graduates from the University of Ohio in 1832. Arbuckle states that "an amiable woman next to religion is man's greatest consolation" but he seeks to remain a bachelor himself. Arbuckle also attended the Staunton Convention leading up to the election of 1832. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

previewthumb

Theodosius Botkin

Downing, George

This portrait of Theodosius Botkin was taken in Topeka, Kansas, when he served in the legislature. He came to Kansas in 1865 and settled in Linn County. He taught school and was later principal at Pleasanton for four years. In 1875, he located to Mound City and was admitted to the bar. Botkin served as probate judge in Linn County and police judge of Mound City. In March 1889, Governor Humphrey appointed him judge of the Thirty-second District in Stevens County. It was in his court that Samuel N. Wood was assassinated in June, 1891. Impeachment proceedings were brought against Botkin, but he was acquitted on all charges. Botkin resigned the judgeship on October 11, 1892 and he moved to Hutchinson, Kansas. In 1896 he was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives from Reno County. A year later he was named commander of the Grand Army, Department of Kansas. In 1901 he settled in Salt Lake, Utah where he practiced law. Botkin died May 27, 1918 in Salt Lake.

previewthumb

William Henry Avery

A portrait of Governor William Henry Avery seated at his desk in the Kansas Capitol. He was born August 11, 1911 near Wakefield, Kansas, and graduated from Wakefield High School and the University of Kansas. A Republican, Avery served in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1950 to 1955. In 1954, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives and served until 1964. During his 10 years in Congress, he served on numerous committees. In 1964, Avery was elected the 37th governor of Kansas. He served one term as governor, losing a re-election bid to Robert Docking in 1966. After an unsuccessful bid for the United States Senate, Avery returned to private life.

previewthumb

Fire Station no. 4, Topeka, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows a horse drawn fire wagon in front of Fire Station No., 4 located near 8th and Clay in Topeka, Kansas. The men gathered around the wagon have been identified from left to right as: Will Hall, C. McCabe, Captain A.M. Robinson and E.L. Robinson.

previewthumb

A.S. Wilson to Henry J. Allen

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

A.S. Wilson, an attorney in Galena, Kansas, writes to Governor Henry J. Allen to indicate his interest in a law that would allow second class cities to separate the schools based on "white and colored children." He included a petition with signatures with the letter.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Places -- Counties

Government and Politics

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Date

Education

Environment

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

People

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation

Type of Material