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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 18 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

A.S. Wilson to Henry J. Allen

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

A.S. Wilson, an attorney in Galena, Kansas, writes to Governor Henry J. Allen to indicate his interest in a law that would allow second class cities to separate the schools based on "white and colored children." He included a petition with signatures with the letter.

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Jonathan Crews to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Crews, Jonathan

Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence relating to the Kansas State Temperance Union and its activities promoting the enforcement of prohibition in the state of Kansas. Frank M. Stahl served as superintendent and John Marshall served as attorney. They wrote a number of the letters contained in this collection. Leaders of the temperance movement frequently corresponded with county attorneys, civic leaders, ministers, and pastors. Included are several letters supporting James A. Lyons of Langdon, Kansas, who was charged with selling intoxicating liquors, and a circular announcing the guilty verdict in the case of Assistant Attorney General C. W. Trickett of Wyandotte County, Kansas, who accepted illegal fees in the prosecution of liquor cases. The collection contains correspondence from numerous Kansas communities.

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Knox & Kellogg to James B. Abbott

Attorneys Knox & Kellogg wrote from St. Louis to James Abbott in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, responding to a lawsuit brought against them by Samuel Cabot. Cabot held them responsible for the long delay in returning several rifles that had been stolen from him the previous spring by Missouri "Highwaymen." Knox and Kellogg reported to Abbott, acting as agent for Cabot, that the lawsuit had been dismissed and the damage to the rifles was to be appraised by a third party.

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Elisha J. Scott

Elisha J. Scott, 1890-1963, was raised in Topeka's Tennesseetown. As a youth, he possessed a strong drive and a quick wit, which attracted the eye of prominent Topeka minister Charles M. Sheldon. With financial support from Sheldon and his own abilities to succeed, Scott earned his law degree from Washburn College in 1916. During his long career as an attorney, he argued many civil rights and school segregation cases throughout Kansas and the Midwest. Two of Scott's sons, John and Charles, joined him in his law firm of Scott, Scott, Scott, and Jackson. Together they helped to prosecute, at the local level, the landmark civil rights case of Brown v. Topeka Board of Education.

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Earl Thomas Reynolds to Governor Fred Hall

Reynolds, Earl Thomas

This letter was written by Earl Thomas Reynolds, a lawyer in Coffeyville, Kansas, to Governor Fred Hall. Reynolds was concerned that black people in Kansas were not receiving adequate patronage and political party representation in or by the Republican Party, particularly in the third district. Mr Reynolds inquired why should blacks continue to support the Republican Party, at all levels of government, if their support is not rewarded by the party.

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Gasper Christopher Clemens

This black and white photograph shows Gasper Christopher Clemens. A Topeka attorney who represented clients from all walks of life whom were believed to be falsely accused or denied their personal rights. Clemens also gained the reputation as a lecturer who discussed the political issues of the day. When the Populist Party gained momentum in Kansas, Clemens became an active member and served in several positions. One of those positions was legal adviser to Populist Governor Lorenzo D. Lewelling, and the other as court reporter to the Kansas Supreme Court. His battle for justice and equality for the common man prompted Clemens to break away from the Populist Party, in 1897, and to organize within the state the Socialist Party. In 1900, Clemens became the Socialist candidate for Kansas Governor and received about 1,200 votes. With this encouragement, he became the 1902 Socialist candidate for attorney general but was unsuccessful in his bid. After his defeat, Clemens returned to his law practice to advocate and defend those in need.

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George W. Espey to Governor John A. Martin

George W. Espey, an agent of the Palace Drug Store in Ashland, Kansas, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka asking whether he must quit selling alcohol because the county clerk does not have the proper affidavit form for him to fill out to renew his license. Espey asks for a prompt reply because the county attorney has stopped him from doing business.

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Mary Elizabeth Lease

Hardin & Ostergren

This is a portrait of Mary Elizabeth Lease, 1853-1933, a lawyer, orator, and supporter of the Populist Party.

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John James Ingalls

A uncased sixth plate ambrotype portrait of John James Ingalls. He came to the Kansas Territory in the late 1850s. Ingalls, a lawyer and politician, represented Atchison County at the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July, 1859. In January, 1860 and 1861, he was an officer of the council when the legislature met at Lecompton. At the Republican Convention at Lawrence, April, 1860, Ingalls was elected to represent the Kansas Territory at the Chicago National Convention. He later served in the Kansas and the United States Senate.

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