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Page 1 of 1, showing 10 records out of 10 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

James M. Hunter to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Hunter, James M.

James M. Hunter, writing from Westport, Missouri, informed Thomas N. Stinson about a joint land speculation deal involving lots in Tecumseh, KT. Hunter alluded to Governor Andrew Reeder's involvement in the speculative venture.

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Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Nute, Ephraim

Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute inquired about the possibility of Hale arranging a loan of $2000 at reasonable interest for the completion of the Unitarian Church in Lawrence. He reported on the high rates of interest being charged for loans in Kansas Territory and on the general effects of the panic of 1857 on the territorial economy. Nute also expressed his dissatisfaction with the Buchanan administration's handling of the Lecompton Constitution and his hope that a change in presidential administration in 1860 would result in Kansas' admission as a free state.

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Edward B. Smythe to Hiram Hill

Smythe, Edward B.

Edward Smythe wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding his experiences in Manhattan. Smythe described his journey West and his newly established lumber business. He found the people of Manhattan to be enjoyable and prosperous. Smythe illustrated their character by describing the ladies' festival planned for the coming week, in which funds will be raised to defray the expenses of constructing a beautiful new schoolhouse. He added that he would now begin his search for a "better half".

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James Griffing to J. Augusta Goodrich Griffing

Griffing, James S. (James Sayre), 1822-1882

James Griffing wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory, to his wife J. Augusta (Goodrich) Griffing. Mrs. Griffing was visiting her family in New York for the first time since her arrival in Kansas Territory in 1855. Griffing gave his wife instructions about which fruit seeds (plum, cherry, and peach) and cuttings (gooseberry and blackberry) to collect and transport back to Kansas Territory, and described his plan to purchase pine flooring in Leavenworth.

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Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill

Morton, Albert C.

Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Morton related that the fall emigration had begun, Quindaro was crowded, and more buildings were being constructed than ever before. Morton also had found two men interested in renting the home owned by Hill upon its completion. He suggested that it would be best to "keep things quiet" about Samuel N. Simpson, and asked, on the behalf of Guthrie, if Hill planned to travel again to Quindaro.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. After three weeks at the future site of Topeka, Holliday was glad for city comforts. He mentioned the site's beauty, the prospect of building a house on his farm claim, and his personal success since leaving Meadville. On December 18, 1854, he had been unanimously elected President of the Topeka Town Association and appointed temporary agent of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The bottom two-thirds of page 3 and 4 (which contained Holliday's signature) have been cut and removed.

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Henry J. Parker to Hiram Hill

Parker, Henry F.

Henry Parker wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Parker included a list of accounts paid and received on the first page. He looked forward to Hill's visit to K.T. in the fall, but was afraid he would be disappointed as "everybody has the blues"; the scarcity of money was taking its toll on the community. However, Parker said many new houses were being built, though the builders themselves were paid in town lots or lumber instead of money.

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Thomas Bickerton testimony

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This testimony, taken down by Thaddeus Hyatt as part of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, is divided into two parts. It begins with descriptions of his life before he came to Kansas Territory and his efforts to set up a claim outside of Lawrence, including his technique for building his sod house. Thomas Bickerton was a well traveled individual and an influential commander of a free state artillery company. He was involved in skirmishes with border ruffians and in the attack on Franklin. Also, General James Lane sent him to Kansas City to obtain a brass howitzer (later known as the Abbott howitzer) for use against the proslavery forces.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow to Edward Everett Hale

Goodnow, Isaac Tichener, 1814-1894

Isaac T. Goodnow wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Goodnow informed Hale about plans to establish Bluemont Central College (predecessor to Kansas State University) just west of Manhattan, Kansas Territory. He asserted that the college would only add to Manhattan's other advantages -- being on the "natural route of the Pacific" railroad and on the shortest route to the Pike's Peak gold mines. Goodnow asked Hale for a contribution to the building fund for the college.

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L. W. Halbe collection

Halbe, L. W. (Leslie Winfield), 1893-1981

The L. W. (Leslie Winfield) Halbe photo collection consists of 1500 glass plate negatives produced by Halbe during his teenage years. Halbe lived in Dorrance, Russell County, Kansas, and began taking photographs of the region with an inexpensive Sears and Roebuck camera when he was fifteen years old.

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