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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 20 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Lawson Wilson to Lewis Allen Alderson

These three letters are from Lawson Wilson in Lincoln County, North Carolina, to his friend, Lewis Allen Alderson, a student at the University of Ohio in Athens. In his letters, Wilson reminisces about time spent in Athens and seeks news about his old acquaintances. Wilson states that "Nullification has been making a great noise in the South," regarding the ability of individual states to abolish federal laws, particularly relating to tariffs and slave laws in South Carolina. He also mentions that the gold mines in the region are making "a great bustle" and congratulates Alderson on his recent marriage. Alderson moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

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Joan of Arc of the coal fields, near Pittsburg, Kansas

New York Times

This newspaper clipping, from the New York Times, features a fourteen year old girl dubbed "The Joan of Arc of the Coal Fields." The daughter of a coal striker in southeast Kansas, she carried the American flag at the head of 6,000 marchers. The group of protesters marched through the coal fields showing their support for better wages and improved working conditions for their family members who worked in the camps.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Walter Augustus Huxman, (1887-1972) possibly standing in the bucket of a large mine or quarrying shovel. He established his career as a public official by serving as Reno County's assistant attorney from 1915 to 1919, and later as the city attorney of Hutchinson, Kansas from 1919 to 1921. He was elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas. Failing to be reelected in 1939, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Much of this interesting letter, dated November 21, 1858, from Sumner, Kansas Territory, describes the Ingalls law practice and the nature of a "frontier" court proceedings that often attracted "nearly all the population." According to Ingalls, "the chief difficulty arising [in the courts came] from the conflict of the two Codes, adopted by two hostile legislatures, each of which had adherents who call the other 'bogus.'" Ingalls also discussed the business of land sales, as something many others successfully combined with the practice of law.

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A.A. Graham to Governor Henry J. Allen

Graham, A. A. (Albert Adams), 1848-

Attorney A.A. Graham writes Governor Henry Allen with a model for the proposed industrial court that expands the authority of the Public Utilities Commission. The governor has called a special session of the Kansas Legislature to end labor strikes and resolve industrial disputes.

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Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Thomas Ewing, Sr.

Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896

Among other rather mundane items, Ewing told his father back in Ohio that the Democrats had just held a convention at Tecumseh, "which Hugh [Ewing] and Hamp attended," and about the economic conditions in Leavenworth, which were much tied to the success of the "Pikes Peak movement."

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W.M. Nelson to Governor Henry Allen

Nelson, W.M.

W.M. Nelson, a black miner in Croweburg, Kansas, writes Governor Allen about pending legislation involving the Court of Industrial Relations. This legislation would have a panel in charge of hearing both sides of labor disputes. Nelson writes "I did think once when you had this law pass you entruded on the miners of Kansas. But I highly appreciate the action that you taken because it cause many woman an children to get three meals a day." Nelson goes on to say "This is the first time in history that the colored miner had one part of a show in District 17." The Court of Industrial Relations was later passed on January 1920 by special session of the Kansas legislature.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Ingalls devoted much of his April 3, 1860, letter from Sumner to the territory's agricultural prospects, which were still not particularly good: "Corn, pork, and hides" were Kansas's only exports, and they were not very profitable as prices were low. "Considerable attention," wrote Ingalls, "is being paid to the hemp crop" and the wheat seemed to be doing pretty well; various kinds of fruit also "flourishes. . . . I have never seen finer apples than the farmers across the river bring to market. . . . But little is raised in Kansas yet, though much attention is being given to 'orchardizing' this spring." Ingalls was actually considering a move to the Gold County (Colorado) for better business prospects.

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Part I: Child Labor in Sixth Annual Report of the Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics

Kansas. Dept. of Labor and Industry

Part I of this government report addresses the problem of child labor in Kansas, which appeared to be increasing. Most of the report focuses on existing child labor laws in Kansas, statistics about child employment (broken down by county, child?s age, ethnic background, etc?), and the industries that employed children. The report also addresses school attendance and truancy laws (which would effectively curb the unlawful employment of children) and includes the results of interviews with school superintendents and questionnaires filed out by those known to employ children in their businesses. School superintendents were overwhelmingly in favor of compulsory education, and most employers believed that it was important for children to understand the value of hard work (although some did speak about the benefits of school).

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Kansas Emergency Relief Committee accomplishments movie

Kansas. Emergency Relief Commission

This motion picture film documents the various work projects completed in Kansas during President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. It begins with an introduction to the Kansas Emergency Relief Committee personnel, starting with the executive director, John G. Stutz. It then shows the various projects across the state, including the construction of farm ponds and lakes as part of the Water Conservation Program, the renovation and construction of courthouses, schools, libraries, and other public buildings, and the weaving and sewing rooms that produced clothing for needy Kansans. It also includes footage of rabbit drives, dust storms, and women sweeping piles of dust out of their homes. Click on the thumbnails below to play each clip. Click on Text Version for a detailed description of each chapter.

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