Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Built Environment -- Areas of Significance (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Type of Material -- Photographs (Remove)
Date (Remove)
Page 1 of 29, showing 10 records out of 285 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Social work graduates of Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas

Graduates of the Menninger School of Social Work, 1989, are shown in front of the Tower Building of the Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas. In the front row, left to right are Jean Ireland, Charlie Drees, Liz Powers, and Glenn Garcia. In the back row, left to right are Sallie Barnum, Cathy Mazzoa-Rees, Catherine Ossmann and Lynn Hollowell. The Menninger Clinic was created to care for individuals with mood, personality, anxiety and addictive disorders, as well as teaching mental health professionals and advancing mental healthcare through research.

previewthumb

Dental care, Kansas City, Kansas

United States. Works Progress Administration

A young boy getting his teeth cleaned by a dentist in Kansas City, Kansas. This service was provided by the Works Progress Administration's domestic science and food project.

previewthumb

Harvesting Crew, Edwards County, Kansas

These two black and white photographs show a harvesting crew with a Russell steam engine in a wheat field in Edwards County, Kansas.

previewthumb

Wright's Dry Goods store, Columbus, Kansas

An exterior view of Wright's Dry Goods store owned by Isaac Wright, Columbus, Kansas. Employees and possibly customers are posed in the doorways of the business. On the second floor of the building is the law office of C. D. Ashley

previewthumb

C. H. Strieby's blacksmith shop, Council Grove, Kansas

These three black and white photographs show C. H. Strieby's blacksmith shop in Council Grove, Kansas.

previewthumb

North Star Drug Store, Salina, Kansas

These photographs show exterior and interior views of the North Star Drug Store in Salina, Kansas. The first photograph shows an exterior view of the store with four men standing in front of the doorway. They are identified as Emil Lagbach, Bill Cacher (son of Dr. Cacher), A. Lagbach (assistant), and Mister Nelson (druggist). The sign above the doorway includes the traditional mortar and pestle pharmacy symbol, and also has the words "Svensk Apotek," identifying the store as a "Swedish pharmacy." Signs in the window advertise "Wa-Hoo Blood and Nerve Tonic." The second photograph shows an interior view of the store with employees and customers visible in the picture. A display case with boxes of cigars is visible on the left. A table with newspapers and magazines on it is visible in the middle, with other tables and chairs behind it. A soda fountain service counter is visible on the right. Signs above the shelves advertise cigars, perfumes, photo supplies, rubber goods, prescriptions, stationery, and candy.

previewthumb

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

This panoramic view shows Camp Funston and the soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division awaiting the return of their commander Major General Leonard J. Wood from France. The facility located on the Ft. Riley military reservation, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as buildings were laid out uniformly in city block squares with main streets and side streets on either side. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.

previewthumb

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Holt, O.W.

This panoramic view shows civilian workers awaiting their pay at Camp Funston. The facility located on the Ft. Riley military reservation, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as approximately 15,000 carpenters built buildings in city block squares. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.

previewthumb

Lolafaye Coyne, Ph.D., statistician at the Menninger Foundation, Topeka, Kansas

Young, Hank

Lolafaye Coyne, Ph.D., was the statistician for the Research Department of the Menninger Foundation. The Department had many research projects including genetics, schizophrenia, infancy, brain waves and biofeedback, migraines, and social interactions.

previewthumb

Terry Patterson, PhD, researcher at the Menninger Foundation, Topeka, Kansas

Young, Hank

Terry Patterson, PhD, conducted research on schizophrenia at the Menninger Foundation. He is shown here with the reel-to-reel recording tapes used in his research.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Built Environment -- Areas of Significance

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Type of Material -- Photographs

Date

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Education

Environment

Government and Politics

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

People

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation

Type of Material