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Page 1 of 1, showing 10 records out of 10 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding economic conditions in town. Chadwick asked that Hill promptly pay his debt to Abelard Guthrie, a fellow Quindaro investor, who was on the brink of bankruptcy. He added that Clinton County, Missouri, had voted not to invest in the Parkville and Grand River Railroad that fall, which had damaged the possibility for a boom in economic activity for the coming fall. Chadwick reported that heavy rains had hindered transportation on local rivers, but was optimistic that October might bring some money to the town through land sales. No news had been heard from Causin, the Washington attorney who was assisting Hill to retain some disputed lands.

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Walter Pearce Hull photograph collection

Walter Pearce Hull, 1870-1956

This series of photographs was taken by Walter Pearce Hull. He was born November 22, 1870, in Eyota, Minnesota, grew up in Athens, Alabama, and moved to Kansas as a young man. His parents were Joseph Gould Hull, born May 4, 1840 in Orangeville, Ohio and Eliza Jane Westfall, born October 29, 1847 in Bushnell, Illinois. By 1894 he was manager of the Northrup Store in Colony. He served as a 1st Lt. In the 20th Kansas Infantry, U.S. Volunteers, 1898-99, during the Philippine-American War, serving on Frederick Funston's staff. He returned to Iola after he was discharged and was manager of the Northrup store there. Hull was a skilled amateur photographer. Many of the photos were taken while he was courting Lenna Myrtle Jolliffe, 1908-1909. They married December 22, 1909 in Bentonville, Arkansas. They lived at 420 S. Washington Street, Iola and had three children: Harriet, born September 29, 1910, Berrien Jolliffe, born October 15, 1913, and Lenna Doris, born December 3, 1915.

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Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908

Mary Holliday wrote from Meadville, Pennsylvania to her husband Cyrus K. Holliday in Kansas Territory. This, the second letter he received from her, reported the health of his brother George Holliday's family and mentioned her giving money, earned by selling a locket, to his mother. Mary Holliday eloquently expressed her love and the difficulty of their separation. After joking that her cooking skill should meet Kansas Territory standards, she mentioned the plans of Lowry Trowbridge and George Merriman, Pennsylvanians with Kansas fever.

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Inaugural Address of R. J. Walker, Governor of Kansas Territory. Delivered in Lecompton, K. T., May 27, 1857

Walker, Robert J. (John), 1801-1869

In this long and formal printed document directed to the citizens of Kansas, Robert Walker reviewed various issues facing Kansas Territory. He argued that all of the voters of Kansas Territory needed to vote on the Constitution and that he was pledged to seeing that the elections were fair. He explained that this was the procedure that had been set up by Congress. The address also discussed issues related to public lands in Kansas, particularly grants of lands for railroads and schools and to taxation. Walker addressed the issue of slavery in detail and explained that the "law of the thermometer, of latitude or altitude, regulating climate, labor and productions" would determine the extent of the spread of slavery based on profit and loss. Walker explained that this law rendered slavery unprofitable in cooler climates which were "unsuited to the tropical constitution of the negro race." He also argued that it was more important that the people of Kansas determined their government rather than not having one because of the issue of slavery.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow to Edward Everett Hale

Goodnow, Isaac Tichener, 1814-1894

Isaac T. Goodnow wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Goodnow informed Hale about plans to establish Bluemont Central College (predecessor to Kansas State University) just west of Manhattan, Kansas Territory. He asserted that the college would only add to Manhattan's other advantages -- being on the "natural route of the Pacific" railroad and on the shortest route to the Pike's Peak gold mines. Goodnow asked Hale for a contribution to the building fund for the college.

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Scenes of Sherman County, Kansas

Multiple scenes of Sherman County, Kansas.

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John Christoph photograph album

This album contains photographs of Ellinwood and Barton County, Kansas, taken by John Christoph. On June 18, 1891, he opened a photography gallery in the north room of a furniture store and continued in the business until February 14, 1919. Christoph also served as the Ellinwood police judge for twenty years.

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L. W. Halbe collection

Halbe, L. W. (Leslie Winfield), 1893-1981

The L. W. (Leslie Winfield) Halbe photo collection consists of 1500 glass plate negatives produced by Halbe during his teenage years. Halbe lived in Dorrance, Russell County, Kansas, and began taking photographs of the region with an inexpensive Sears and Roebuck camera when he was fifteen years old.

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George S. Park to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Park, George S.

George Park wrote from Parkville, Missouri, to Isaac Goodnow, mentioning his efforts to obtain land for Goodnow's "Agricultural College". Park told Goodnow to have his "leading men" write letters to Congress in order to obtain a land grant. He also observed that emigrants were beginning to come in droves.

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Samuel Clarke Pomeroy to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891

Samuel Pomeroy wrote to Isaac Goodnow from Atchison, Kansas Territory. Pomeroy told Goodnow he was not disposed at the moment to come to Manhattan on account of lawsuits and railroad business, but would come as soon as possible. He looked forward to being present when the cornerstone of the Bluemont College building was placed, and asked Goodnow to list him as a subscriber to Manhattan's new newspaper. Pomeroy also referred to the upcoming election the following June, which would determine the delegates to attend the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, and prayed for a successful outcome.

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