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Places -- Counties -- Douglas (Remove)
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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 11 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Ephraim Nute

Portrait of Rev. Ephraim Nute. He was a Unitarian minister in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Nute served as chaplain for the Territorial Legislature at Lecompton and was a chaplain for the First Regiment of the Kansas Volunteers.

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James Blood correspondence

James Blood was involved with the first party of New England Emigrant Aid Company settlers who arrived to Kansas in late July 1854. Blood was actively engaged from the beginning in the free-state movement. He served as treasurer of the Kansas State Central Committee, 1856-1857, as a member of the Topeka legislature, 1856, as the first mayor of Lawrence in 1857, as a member of the central territorial committee at the Republican Party's organizing convention in May 1859, as county treasurer in the early 1860s, and as a representative from Lawrence in the 1869 state legislature. He died in Lawrence on February 4, 1891. This folder of correspondence focuses on the years 1854 to 1861, with some letters discussing border problems with Missouri and the need for additional troops and artillery.

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J. Heath to John Stillman Brown

Heath, J.

A letter written by J. Heath from Paola, Kansas, addressed to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Brown had apparently asked Heath for assistance in helping him become an Army chaplain, but Heath's letter informed him that the request was made too late. Heath also discusses camp life in Paola.

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William Brown to Sarah Brown

Brown, William

This letter, written by William Brown from Topeka, Kansas, was addressed to his sister, Sarah Brown, in Lawrence. William and Sarah were children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. William discussed a Baptist church service in Topeka and the recent Kansas State Fair. The latter part of the letter discusses political issues, including recent elections and fear that the "bushwackers" may attack Leavenworth or Fort Scott.

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Forest Savage

This black and white photograph shows Forest Savage, (1826-1915), copied from the book "A History of Lawrence, Kansas: From the First Settlement to the Close of the Rebellion" by Richard Cordley. Savage, a musician and member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, migrated, on August 29, 1854, to Lawrence, Kansas with brother John. After their arrival to the Kansas Territory on September 11, 1854, the men founded the first musical band in Kansas. The newly formed band grew in membership and became instrumental in entertaining settlers and troops in the days leading up to the start of the Civil War. In October of 1864, during Price's Raid, the band went into battle and served as a militia band for nearly two weeks before returning home. Their military career's were short lived but their musical careers would live on. In 1867, the musicians would play for the first commencement at the University of Kansas. On September 15, 1879, the remaining members of the band, including Forest Savage, gathered one last time to performed for the twenty-fifth anniversary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's arrival to Lawrence, Kansas. Forest Savage lived his remaining years in the town he migrated to as a young man. On August 17, 1915 at the age of eighty-nine, he passed away quietly in his home. Burial was conducted in Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Sarah Brown to William Brown

Brown, Sarah

A letter written by Sarah Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to her brother, William Brown, who was in college in New York. The first part of her letter discusses the presence of the Kansas First in Lawrence. She describes the soldiers as "rough" and notes the proslavery attitude of the regiment, which leads them to abuse African Americans living in Lawrence. Sarah goes on to discuss her views on the need for immediate emancipation. She discusses family issues such as the death of her cousin and a scrapbook she was making with her sister, Mary. The last portion of the letter discusses Sarah's interest in botany and local plants. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.

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Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Webber, L. R.

A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Gibson County, West Tennessee, addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber begins with the news that the troops may return to Kansas, though he and the other soldiers particularly wished to avoid Lawrence due to previous negative experience there. He describes camp news as well as local individuals and commerce. The second portion of Webber's letter relates news that the troops would be sent back to Missouri and expresses dread at the prospect of guerrilla warfare.

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M.R. Brown to William Brown

Brown, Mary Ripley, d. 1878

A letter written from Lawrence, Kansas, by M.R. Brown, addressed to her son, William Brown, who was in college in New York. Brown begins by discussing the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. She discusses the 300 African Americans who had fled slavery and were now living in Lawrence, and the efforts of an African-American minister in the community. Brown expresses fear that Lawrence would be attacked by Missourians. She also gives news of Leigh R. Webber, a Kansas soldier who often wrote to members of the Brown family.

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Hugh Dunn Fisher

A portrait of Hugh Dunn Fisher, a Methodist minister that settled in Lawrence, Kansas, during the Civil War. He served as chaplain of the Fifth Kansas Volunteer Cavalry. Fisher survived Quantrill's raid by hiding in a cellar under his home. He wrote a autobiography "the Gun and The Gospel".

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James H. Buxton to D.L. Chandler

Buxton, James H.

A letter written by James H. Buxton from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to Daniel L. Chandler, an army hospital steward who had cared for Buxton. James describes life in Lawrence with members of the John Stillman Brown family. He also mentions the removal of troops from Lawrence to Fort Riley and expresses his wish to live with Chandler after the end of the war.

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