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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 11 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Charles Arbuckle to Lewis Allen Alderson

These four letters are from Charles Arbuckle to Lewis Allen Alderson. Arbuckle writes from Alderson's hometown of Lewisburg, West Virginia. In the letters, Arbuckle encourages Alderson to propose to Miss Lucy B. Miles, whom Alderson marries the day after he graduates from the University of Ohio in 1832. Arbuckle states that "an amiable woman next to religion is man's greatest consolation" but he seeks to remain a bachelor himself. Arbuckle also attended the Staunton Convention leading up to the election of 1832. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

The biggest share of this 8-page letter is devoted to comments on the weather and the environment, in and around Atchison, where Ingalls now had a law practice (for a time, he continued to live in Sumner). He missed some aspects of "Massachusetts weather," but overall he thought Kansas superior: "I have not had a cold in six months and but one or two since I came here . . . [and] The attacks of melancholy and despondency to which I was once a prey have also almost entirely disappeared." Ingalls also wrote of two arson fires--"a large grocery house" and "the steamer Hesperian," and the expected fate of the suspect then in custody.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Ingalls devoted much of his April 3, 1860, letter from Sumner to the territory's agricultural prospects, which were still not particularly good: "Corn, pork, and hides" were Kansas's only exports, and they were not very profitable as prices were low. "Considerable attention," wrote Ingalls, "is being paid to the hemp crop" and the wheat seemed to be doing pretty well; various kinds of fruit also "flourishes. . . . I have never seen finer apples than the farmers across the river bring to market. . . . But little is raised in Kansas yet, though much attention is being given to 'orchardizing' this spring." Ingalls was actually considering a move to the Gold County (Colorado) for better business prospects.

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Fellow Citizens--In Support of the Wyandotte Constitution

Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889

This eleven-page document is a speech or essay, most likely in John Alexander Martin's handwriting, delivered in support of the proposed Wyandotte Constitution that was ratified by the voters of the territory on October 4, 1859. Martin, a twenty-year-old Atchison editor, served as secretary for the convention, which finished its work at the end of July. This speech, attacking the Democrats for conspiring to defeat the latest free-state constitution and for "the Lecomptonizing of Kansas," was undoubtedly delivered several times during the months of August and September, 1859. It addressed the various issues opponents were likely to use to defeat the constitution at the polls and stressed that, in light of actions of "a servile judiciary," slavery could not be removed from Kansas until it was admitted as a "sovereign state."

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Speech, Fellow Citizens--Opposing the Lecompton Constitution

Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889

This hand-written speech appeared to be another by John Alexander Martin, seemingly composed for delivery in the spring and/or early summer of 1858, not long after he took over Atchison's Squatter Sovereign and renamed it Freedom's Champion. Here the speaker aimed his attack at the Buchanan administration and the English Bill, and the renewed attempt to pass the Lecompton Constitution at a referendum scheduled for August 2, 1858, and thus overturn the free-state victory that had already been won. The speaker seemed confident it would be defeated, as the constitution itself had been in January, but hoped for an overwhelming vote against (perhaps as many as 15,000).

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Kansas and Nebraska Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Minutes of the Third Session

Methodist Episcopal Church. Kansas and Nebraska Conference

The annual conference was held in Topeka, Kansas Territory from April 15 through 19, 1858. The minutes included the names of those attending as well as the business conducted. It listed the various ministerial appointments in Kansas and Nebraska as well as the membership of the committees. The minutes reported on educational efforts at Baker University and Blue Mount Central College. It contained information on the church's stand on slavery and temperance. The constitution of the Kansas and Nebraska Conference Missionary Society was included in the report as were statistics for the various churches.

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John James Ingalls

A uncased sixth plate ambrotype portrait of John James Ingalls. He came to the Kansas Territory in the late 1850s. Ingalls, a lawyer and politician, represented Atchison County at the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, July, 1859. In January, 1860 and 1861, he was an officer of the council when the legislature met at Lecompton. At the Republican Convention at Lawrence, April, 1860, Ingalls was elected to represent the Kansas Territory at the Chicago National Convention. He later served in the Kansas and the United States Senate.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

From Sumner on June 10, 1859, just days after the election for delegates to the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, Ingalls wrote his father about the "well fought" contest in a county (Atchison) that was "an old stronghold of pro-slavery democracy." Ingalls won, of course, even though he at first "regarded the contest as a hopeless one," but still feared that the Democrats could control the convention; if so, "Kansas may be a Slave State after all. . . . It is Estimated that there are five hundred slaves in the territory today by virtue of the Dred Scott decision. A family recently came to this place from Kentucky with five."

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Samuel Clarke Pomeroy to Thaddeus Hyatt

Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891

In this letter, S. C. Pomeroy wrote from Atchison, Kansas to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The letter revolved around the suffering of the settlers and their desperate search for provisions and employment. Pomeroy also mentioned the prospect of obtaining a large amount of buffalo meat, as well as the failed corn crop and the generally destitute condition of the settlers. He truly feared for the lives of the settlers during the upcoming winter.

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Nebraska and Kanzas

J. H. Colton & Co.,

The map, published in 1855, showed the eastern portions of both Kansas and Nebraska. The Nebraska portion depicts the counties that had been established at that time. The Kansas portion included cities, various Indian reservations, and rivers.

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