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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 14 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Kansas Territory citizens to the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America

This unsigned statement was written to protest "the practice of taxing the people of the Territories for the support of a Government in which they are not represented." The residents of Kansas Territory complained that they had had no voice in how these tax dollars were appropriated, and they asked this "honorable body" to remit to them these taxes. Since this was during the drought of 1860, they declared that they would use these funds for famine relief.

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John William Gardiner diary

Gardiner, John William, 1851-1917

John William Gardiner was born in or near Platte City, Missouri, in 1851. In March 1855, Gardiner and his family moved to the future site of Winchester, Jefferson County, in the newly opened Kansas Territory. During 1875, he taught school and simultaneously took classes in Leavenworth to obtain his teaching certificate. Many of the diary entries describe his teaching, weather, the grasshopper plague, and extracurricular activities such as singing and visiting friends. A transcription prepared by the diary donor, Allen Gardiner, follows the diary images and includes a one page introduction. An uncorrected, searchable OCR file is available as "Text Version" below.

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Drouthy Kansas

Worrall, Henry

This painting by Henry Worrall, completed in 1878, challenges the assumption that Kansas was part of the "Great American Desert." Although there had, indeed, been a severe drought during 1860, Worrall believed that Kansas did not deserve this harsh reputation. In the foreground, his painting depicts the bountiful harvests of grain, watermelon, and potatoes, while the background includes rain showers and a rainbow stretching across the horizon. Although Worrall was a very productive artist, "Drouthy Kansas" quickly became his most famous work.

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Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows the preliminary sketches by Regionalist artist John Steuart Curry, (1897-1946), for the rotunda at the statehouse in Topeka, Kansas. The sketches were a reflection of the "historic struggle of man with nature" and how the hand of erosion was moving toward the abandoned farm house. These panels were to be commissioned into murals for the second chapter in the state's history. However, the proposals never became a reality because of the controversy surrounding Curry's earlier projects "Tragic Prelude" and the "Kansas Pastoral" which illustrated the first and third chapters in the state's history on the second-floor of the capitol.

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A. Venard to Thaddeus Hyatt

Venard, A.

This letter is from A. Venard, a medical doctor from Pleasant Grove, Kansas Territory, who wrote to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The letter described the sickness and disease that plagued the settlers along the Verdigris River in southeast Kansas. Dr. Venard had worked diligently to aid the settlers, even using funds from his own pocket to purchase medicine, but he requested that the committee give him 100 dollars worth of drugs. Attached to this letter is an itemized list of the drugs he wished purchased with the requested funds.

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Kansas Emergency Relief Committee accomplishments movie

Kansas. Emergency Relief Commission

This motion picture film documents the various work projects completed in Kansas during President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. It begins with an introduction to the Kansas Emergency Relief Committee personnel, starting with the executive director, John G. Stutz. It then shows the various projects across the state, including the construction of farm ponds and lakes as part of the Water Conservation Program, the renovation and construction of courthouses, schools, libraries, and other public buildings, and the weaving and sewing rooms that produced clothing for needy Kansans. It also includes footage of rabbit drives, dust storms, and women sweeping piles of dust out of their homes. Click on the thumbnails below to play each clip. Click on Text Version for a detailed description of each chapter.

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Sam Gabbert's ranch between Englewood and Ashland, Kansas

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

This is a view of cattle and cowboys along a river on the Sam Gabbert ranch located between Ashland and Englewood, Kansas. There were 1,500 head of cattle in this herd.

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Family with their sod house, Decatur County, Kansas

This is a photograph of an unidentified family standing in front of their sod house near Norcatur, Decatur County, Kansas. Visible in the photograph is a windmill.

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Anna Margaret Watson Randolph, diary

Randolph, Anna Margaret Watson, 1838-1917

This brief diary, kept by Anna Margaret (Watson) Randolph, begins with her move to Kansas in an entry dated August 17, 1858. These six entries at the beginning of her diary provide details about her family's journey from Ohio to Kansas Territory, included a number of interesting accounts of their journey on a riverboat. Their boat ran aground several times and, interspersed among her descriptions of these difficulties, Anna wrote about her sister Mary Jane, the weather, and her personal observances of other passengers. She also filled her diary with her frustrations and concerns during their arduous journey west.

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Tornado

Herschel C. Logan

A black ink on paper woodcut showing a tornado moving through a farm yard. Tornado was drawn by Herschel C. Logan, who was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri , and shortly after his birth the family moved to Winfield, Kansas. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts for one year. Logan was a commercial and advertising artist in Salina, Kansas, until his retirement in 1968. He was a member of the Prairie Print Makers. After retirement, Logan moved to Santa Ana, California.

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