Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Transportation -- Water (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Lawyers (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 1 of 1, showing 5 records out of 5 total, starting on record 1, ending on 5

<< previous| | next >>

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Thomas Ewing, Jr. to William S. Reyburn

In his capacity as attorney for H. B. Denman, who had just "bought of [John A.] Halderman the interest of the latter in the ferry, Ewing wrote to Reyburn, of Philadelphia, to encourage "an amicable settlement" to avoid taking their disagreement to court. The nature of their dispute was not entirely clear, but Ewing insisted that if not settled it could undermine the legitimacy of the ferry company's charter in the eyes of the soon to be constituted State government.

previewthumb

John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

On the first leg of his move to Sumner, Kansas Territory, John J. Ingalls, a 24-year-old Massachusetts lawyer, wrote this brief letter from Boston, Mass., to his father, Elias T. Ingalls. Here Ingalls wrote regarding the fare and "the best method of getting West."

previewthumb

John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

The biggest share of this 8-page letter is devoted to comments on the weather and the environment, in and around Atchison, where Ingalls now had a law practice (for a time, he continued to live in Sumner). He missed some aspects of "Massachusetts weather," but overall he thought Kansas superior: "I have not had a cold in six months and but one or two since I came here . . . [and] The attacks of melancholy and despondency to which I was once a prey have also almost entirely disappeared." Ingalls also wrote of two arson fires--"a large grocery house" and "the steamer Hesperian," and the expected fate of the suspect then in custody.

previewthumb

W.T. Sherman, Thomas Ewing, & McCook, to George B. Parker

Sherman, Ewing & McCook

Although unclear as to the exact nature of the litigation, this letter from the Leavenworth firm pertained to the taking of depositions in "the case against the steamboat Isabella". The Isabella was a side-wheeler which made regular runs to Sioux City during 1858, and in this case apparently came to the aid of the Kate Howard when ice forced her to "give up her trip".

previewthumb

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Webber, L. R.

A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from "Steamer Robert Campbell Jr. near Liberty Mo.," is addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber describes how his fellow troops have become more experienced soldiers "who fight for liberty and law." He discusses the march from Fort Riley to Fort Leavenworth and conditions on the boat that was taking them further south. He also mentiones William Brown's new law position with former Kansas Territory governor Wilson Shannon.

previewthumb
<< previous| | next >>