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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Barclay's Business Directory of Leavenworth for 1859

Pierse, Allen

In addition to a listing of businesses and advertisements, the directory included the elected officials for the city of Leavenworth for 1858-59 and the newspapers published in Leavenworth. A few women are listed as owners of businesses. The information for the directory was compiled by Allen Pierse.

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Leavenworth Constitutional Convention journal

Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913

The Leavenworth constitution was the third of four constitutions proposed for Kansas statehood and the second free-state constitution (after the Topeka and before the Wyandotte constitutions). Delegates for the territory's third constitutional convention were elected on March 9 and assembled in Leavenworth on March 25, 1858. The delegates considered the "Homestead Exemption" during the morning session, April 1, 1858. The provision was amended so as to make the basic exemption 160 acres or not over $2,000. The vote on this was recorded and the yeas and nays are followed by numerous explanations--many delegates who voted nay did so not because they opposed the concept.

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Samuel W. Greer, report

Greer, Samuel W

This printed report was submitted to the Kansas Territorial Legislature by Gov. Medary on January 4, 1860. S. W. Greer, the Territorial Superintendent of Common Schools reported that fifteen counties had submitted reports and schools were taught in 136 districts comprising 7,029 children. He reported on how he visited school districts and included some information on various types of schools in the state. He wrote that the pay for the superintendent was inadequate, due to the value of territorial scrip being worth 30 cents on the dollor. He indicated that he had to use $500 of his own funds in the past year. He wrote about the need to establish normal schools (for training teachers) and to hold teachers' institutes. He wanted to increase the standards for teacher qualifications. He also discussed various aspects of educational methodologies of the period. He included short reports from the following counties: Douglas, Anderson, Jackson, Nemaha, and Osage as well as some statistics from all organized counties. This report was taken from the Journal of the House of Representatives, Kansas Territory, 1859, pages 34 through 82.

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William Brown to Sarah Brown

Brown, William

This letter, written by William Brown from Topeka, Kansas, was addressed to his sister, Sarah Brown, in Lawrence. William and Sarah were children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. William discussed a Baptist church service in Topeka and the recent Kansas State Fair. The latter part of the letter discusses political issues, including recent elections and fear that the "bushwackers" may attack Leavenworth or Fort Scott.

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William Addison Phillips

Portrait of William Addison Phillips, an author, lawyer, journalist and politician. In 1857, Phillips attended the Constitution Convention at Topeka and the Free State Conventions at Centropolis, Lawrence, and Grasshopper Falls. He founded the town of Salina in April, 1858. In that same month and year, Phillips was nominated at the Topeka Free-State Convention under the Leavenworth Constitution to serve as a supreme court judge. He attended the Convention at Osawatomie and the Republican State Convention at Lawrence in 1859. Phillips served in the Kansas Volunteer Regiments and rose to the rank of colonel. From March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875 Phillips was an at large representative to the United States Congress and from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1879 he represented the First District.

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Veto Message of Andrew Horatio Reeder, Governor of Kansas Territory together with A Memorial from the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Kansas to His Excellency, Franklin Pierce, President of the United States

Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864

This printed pamphlet contained Andrew Reeder's veto messge for two bills passed by the territorial legislature. He based his veto not on the content of the bills but on the argument that the legislation was not passed at the official "seat of government." He explained his position in detail citing federal legislation and acts of the territorial legislature. The "Memorial" from the territorial legislature included a request that Reeder be removed as territorial governor with explanations of their grievances against Reeder. The item included the names of the members of the Council and members of the House.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Back in Sumer on August 14, 1859, Ingalls wrote regarding the convention's recently completed work and the prospects for the Wyandotte Constitution, now "before the people." The Democrats were "taking strong ground against it" because of the state boundaries set by the delegates (excluded "Southern Nebraska & Pike's Peak"), there was to be no exclusion of "free negroes" from Kansas, and of the "apportionment," which gave the Republicans, and thus their proposed constitution, a big advantage. "The democracy are furious about it [the apportionment] of course and some temporizing Republicans are inclined to smooth the matter over by explanations and euphimisms. I adopt a different ground . . . ." Ingalls argued that he "was not aware of any extreme favors or kindnesses extended to the people of Kansas in the last four years by the democratic party which warranted any very delicate considerations form the party in power today."

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James Griffing to J. Augusta Goodrich Griffing

Griffing, James S. (James Sayre), 1822-1882

James Griffing wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory, to his wife J. Augusta (Goodrich) Griffing. Mrs. Griffing was visiting her family in New York for the first time since her arrival in Kansas Territory in 1855. Griffing gave his wife instructions about which fruit seeds (plum, cherry, and peach) and cuttings (gooseberry and blackberry) to collect and transport back to Kansas Territory, and described his plan to purchase pine flooring in Leavenworth.

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William H. Russell

A formal portrait of William H. Russell, who was a proslavery supporter and businessman. In the winter of 1858-1859, Russell, with Alexander Majors, William Waddell, and John Jones, founded the Leavenworth and Pike's Peak Express Company, a freight and stage company that operated between Leavenworth and Denver, Colorado. In February, 1860, it was reorganized as the Central Overland California & Pike's Peak Express Company. In 1860, Russell, with partners Majors and Waddell, created the first Pony Express, which connected St. Joseph, Missouri, across 2,000 miles to the state of California.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

From Lawrence, K.T., where he went to lobby the territorial legislature on behalf of Sumner's city charter and a "Pikes Peak Express Company," John J. Ingalls wrote to tell his father about the journey that took him through Leavenworth. He made some interesting observations about the condition of the roads and the general discomfort involved in overland travel ("The coaches are constructed with special reference to safety in passing over corduroy roads, through sloughs and ravines, having no regard whatever to the comfort of the passengers."), as well as nice descriptions of both cities, Leavenworth and Lawrence.

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