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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 11 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

George Washington Brown to Eli Thayer

Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915

George Washington Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom newspaper, was one of seven free state leaders arrested on May 14, 1856 on charges of high treason and held prisoner by federal troops near Lecompton. G. W. Brown described the sack of Lawrence and the destruction of his printing press, commented upon the harshness of his prison conditions, and asked Eli Thayer to do anything in his power to help secure his release.

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Robert John Walker, Proclamation : To the people of Kansas

Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869

Regards the examination of election returns, particularly Oxford Precinct, Johnson County.

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Samuel Medary to Orville Chester Brown (?)

Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864

This letter, presumably addressed to Orville Brown, was written by Samuel Medary, the current governor of Kansas Territory. Governor Medary was pleased that the volatile situation during the border wars had calmed down, and he encouraged Brown to foster an environment focused on "peace and industry." The governor also hoped that, with things settling down, more emigrants would come into Kansas.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Governor Samuel Medary, veto message on the bill prohibiting slavery in Kansas.

Medary, S. (Samuel), 1801-1864

Samuel Medary presented a very detailed message about why he was vetoring a bill prohibiting slavery in Kansas that had been passed by the territorial House of Representatives. This printed document contained a long discussion about the sovereignty (or lack thereof) by the federal government, territories and states and how that applied to the institution of slavery. He ultimately argued that the law passed contained no means of enforcement but only enacted the "declaratory" statement about slavery contained in the Wyandotte Constitution.

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Samuel Medary

Samuel Medary served as territorial governor of Kansas from December 20, 1859 until December 10, 1860. He was a friend of Stephen Douglas and a Jacksonian Democrat. He supported the nomination of James Polk for the presidency. Prior to his service in Kansas, he was the territorial governor in Minnesota from 1857 to 1858. He was born in Pennsylvania but spent most of his life in Ohio.

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Governor George Monroe Beebe, annual message

Beebe, George Monroe 1836-1927

George Beebe assumed the title of Acting Governor of Kansas Territory upon the resignation of Samuel Medary. In this printed message from the Executive Office, Kansas Territory (Lecompton) to the territorial legislature, Beebe commented on Medary and other issues relating to Kansas Territory. He included information from the auditor about the amount of taxes that had been collected. He also referenced the pending dissolution of the Union and the "gloom" that brought to all.

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Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908

Mary Holliday of Meadville, Pennsylvania reported the contents of a letter her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, had received from William D. Paul of Topeka, Kansas Territory. Cyrus was speaking in New Castle, PA on the behalf of Republican presidential candidate John C. Fremont. Paul wrote that Harry G. Young was living in Cyrus' Topeka house. Milton C. Dickey and Dr. George A. Cutler had returned to Topeka without weapons, to the disappointment of the "Topeka boys," who anticipated conflict with Missourians. Mary recommended reading the New York Times. She wrote of her dissatisfaction with their separation and readiness to emigrate to Kansas Territory.

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Inaugural Address of R. J. Walker, Governor of Kansas Territory. Delivered in Lecompton, K. T., May 27, 1857

Walker, Robert J. (John), 1801-1869

In this long and formal printed document directed to the citizens of Kansas, Robert Walker reviewed various issues facing Kansas Territory. He argued that all of the voters of Kansas Territory needed to vote on the Constitution and that he was pledged to seeing that the elections were fair. He explained that this was the procedure that had been set up by Congress. The address also discussed issues related to public lands in Kansas, particularly grants of lands for railroads and schools and to taxation. Walker addressed the issue of slavery in detail and explained that the "law of the thermometer, of latitude or altitude, regulating climate, labor and productions" would determine the extent of the spread of slavery based on profit and loss. Walker explained that this law rendered slavery unprofitable in cooler climates which were "unsuited to the tropical constitution of the negro race." He also argued that it was more important that the people of Kansas determined their government rather than not having one because of the issue of slavery.

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William Weer, Brief for Applicant

Weer, William

William Weer served as legal counsel for the Wyandotte Reserve and presented this brief on behalf of William Lykins and Robert Robitaille apparently to the Commissioner of the Land Office at Lecompton, Kansas Territory. Lykins and Robitaille were attempting to receive a patent for land that was also claimed by the Lawrence Association, Gaius Jenkins, Charles Robinson, S. J. Livingston, George G. Mathews, and William Savage. The brief contained a short history of the Wyandot tribes removal west and various treaties involving land. The claim involved parts of the city of Lawrence. The brief cited various cases and laws upon which Mr. Weer based his arguments.

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