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Page 1 of 1, showing 8 records out of 8 total, starting on record 1, ending on 8

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow to Harriet Goodnow

Goodnow, Ellen Denison (Mrs. Isaac T.)

Ellen Goodnow, wife of Isaac Goodnow, wrote to her sister-in-law, Harriet, in New England. In this mostly personal letter, Goodnow reports on the joys and limitations of life in Kansas Territory, stating "I can say truly that I enjoy life as well here as I ever did anywhere." She did not anticipate trouble from border ruffians in their area, as her family's settlement was "too far from Missouri, too near Fort Riley", telling Harriet she would be "enraptured. . .in this country"; Ellen looked forward to a visit from her.

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The Kanzas region: forest, prairie, desert, mountain, vale, and river

Greene, Max.

The title page for this volume continued with "Descriptions of scenery, climate, wild productions, capabilities of soil, and commercial resources; interspersed with incidents of travel, and anecdotes illustrative of the character of the traders and red men; to which are added directions as to routes, outfit for the pioneer, and sketches of desirable localities for present settlement." A small map is opposite the title page. The "Addenda" included several "Laws Governing Kanzas," a section on the objects and plans of an Emigrant Aid Company, information about the American Settlement Company, and prices for various items in Lawrence. Also included in the "Addenda" was the text of the Kansas Nebraska Act, which was not scanned as it is available elsewhere on this site.

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History of Kansas and emigrant's guide

Chapman, J. Butler

The title page of the printed volume indicated that it contained "a description geographical and topographical--also climate, soil, productions and comparative value with other states and territories, including its political history, officers-candidates-emigrant colonies-election, abolition, squatter and pro-slavery contentions and inquisitions; with the prospects of the territory for freedom or slavery." Mr. Chapman was a resident of the territory and the information in the booklet was compiled by traveling through Kansas Territory in 1854. The description covers most of the territory and includes information about Native American tribes and lands.

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Territorial Census, 1855, District 1

Babcock, Carmi W., 1830-1889

This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, male, female, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over 21 were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. A statistical summary of the census follows the enumeration pages. For District 1, the place of election was the office of Dr. Charles Robinson in Lawrence. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The description of the First District follows: "Commencing at the Missouri State line, on the south bank of the Kansas River; thence along the south bank of said river to the first tributary or watered ravine running into the Kansas above the town of Lawrence, thence up that tributary to the head thereof; thence in a direct line to the west side of __Rolf's house; thence, by a due south line, to the Santa Fe Road; thence by the middle of said road to the Missouri State line; and thence by said State line to the place of beginning."

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Great Kanzas Enterprise, Circular of the American Settlement Company

American Settlement Company.

This brochure, published by the American Settlement Company, encourages the settlement of Council City (later Burlingame) on the Santa Fe Road in Kansas Territory. It includes the constitution of the American Settlement Company, descriptions of Kansas Territory climate and soil, and testimonials from the company's representative in Kansas Territory.

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Oscar E. Learnard to friends

Learnard, Oscar E.

From Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Oscar Learnard wrote briefly to some Vermont friends of his recent "military" experience as "Lieutenant Colonel of the 4th regiment (cavalry) of Kansas Volunteers." At the time, Learnard said "the whole Territory presents a scene of wide spread desolation," but he also claimed Kansas was a beautiful place full of opportunity for agriculturalists and real estate investors. At present, however, one should only come if well armed and via "the new road" [Lane Trail].

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James R. Mead to his father

Mead, James R. (James Richard), b. 1836

In this letter, James Mead writes from Tecumseh, Kansas Territory, to his father about his efforts to secure a claim. He includes information about the people of the territory, the beautiful vegetation, and the flourishing towns. Mead also writes of the immense amount of traffic along the Santa Fe Trail and of the roads to Lecompton and Topeka, which he declares are "the best roads I ever saw anywhere." In addition, he describes the buildings of Burlingame, Kansas Territory, and the make up of the community. At the end of the letter, he mentions the new constitution, which "is all Free State." These typed copies of the James R. Mead's letters were donated to the Kansas State Historical Society by Mr. Mead's family in 1940 when the originals were still owned by the family. The originals are now held by Wichita State University.

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Kansas State Seal

Cultural Heritage and Arts Center

The State Seal of Kansas. The Seal of Kansas and the state motto, Ad astra per aspera (to the stars through difficulties), were adopted through a joint resolution during the first Kansas legislative session on May 25, 1861.

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