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Places -- Cities and towns -- Osawatomie (Remove)
Places -- Cities and towns (Remove)
Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable -- Relief (Remove)
Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable (Remove)
Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 19 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Orville Chester Brown to unknown

This letter, presumably written by Orville Chester Brown, is an excellent example of a free state perspective on the events of 1856 in Kansas Territory. Speaking in rather eloquent terms, the author expresses anger at the United States government for their refusal to aid free state settlers.

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E. B. Whitman to Samuel L. Adair

Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883

E. B. Whitman, located in Lawrence, was the general agent for the National Kansas Committee that was distributing relief supplies in Kansas Territory. He writes that he is sending Adair potatoes and corn to be distributed for planting. Evidently, Adair had written him previously about some boxes of supplies he expected, and Whitman speculates that some boxes might be on the steamer "Light Foot" on the Kansas River in Wyandotte, Kansas Territory, and some might be in St. Louis, Missouri.

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A. Finch to Thaddeus Hyatt

Finch, H.

This letter, written from Osawatomie by A. Finch to Thaddeus Hyatt, chairman of the National Kansas Committee, provided general information about the inhabitants of Osawatomie and neighboring areas. It included a list of about half of the settlers residing in Osawatomie at this time, including the four pro-slavery voters. Mr. Finch went into detail about the most fertile areas that would be excellent sites for free state settlements, and about the economic conditions and financial needs of the settlers.

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Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair

Darrach, Barstow

Dr. Barstow Darrach had returned to New York Hospital after being in Kansas Territory. He wrote that he felt the prospects were not very favorable for Kansas Territory. He had found "some warm friends disposed to yield Kansas to the slave power rather than resort to a revolution," and he believed [President] Buchanan would only pretend to support freedom "until the south can make sure of their prize." Darrach felt it would take a large emigration of settlers to Kansas to make it a free state, and that free state settlers would be thwarted by the "bogus authority" and "another mob from Mo." should the Free State party appear at the polls. He stated that "the strongest argument [against success] that I see is that the people do not seem prepared." He wrote that he would ship clothing, flannel cloth, and blankets to Adair by way of W. F. M. Arny in Chicago.

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S.T. Shore, testimony

This testimony, a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, was collected by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. Although Captain Shore was a free state militia captain and was active during the border warfare of 1856, this account focuses on his personal life and his perceptions of the Kansas Territory rather than upon his political or military experiences. The testimony begins with general information about his family, claim, etc., and then proceeds to his personal opinion of the land and vegetation in Kansas.

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Report of a Trip to Kansas

Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881

William F. M. Arny was the general agent of the National Kansas Committee. This report describes the "wants and sufferings" of settlers in Kansas Territory. It includes references to border ruffians, land sales, and the suffering in various districts of Kansas. He requests that aid be sent to the Kansas Central Committee.

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George Cutter, Kansas experience

This reminiscence is presumably from the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, which was compiled by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. George Cutter was with Frederick Brown shortly before the Battle of Osawatomie and, like Brown, he was wounded during an altercation with border ruffians from Missouri. While Cutter was not directly involved in this battle, this reminiscence is still a rather fascinating account of it.

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Samuel L. Adair to Edmund Burke Whitman

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Writing from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, Adair identifies what relief clothing (coats, socks, etc.) he still has on hand and accounts for cash received and expenses incurred.

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James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair

Garrison, James

James Garrison writes to his cousin, Samuel L. Adair, that he has collected $104.75 to be used for relief in Kansas. Garrison is concerned about how to get the money to Adair and suggests that, if Adair has been able to collect on the sale of Rachel Garrison's goods, Adair should use that money instead. He asks Adair to write a letter of acknowledgement to the "Free Presbyterian" published in Yellow Springs, Ohio.

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Thomas Bedoe, testimony

Hyatt, Thaddeus

The testimony of Thomas Bedoe, a portion of the Journal of Investigations of Kansas, was apparently collected by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. It describes in detail the time Mr. Bedoe spent serving in the free state militia in the Osawatomie and Lawrence areas. He was a part of the Battle of Osawatomie and this account provides valuable information about the events preceding the battle.

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