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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 33 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Medical history of the 19th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry Volunteers

Bailey, Mahlon

Mahlon Bailey, the regimental surgeon, recorded this medical history of the 19th Kansas Cavalry. This history includes information on the hasty physicals given to new recruits, wounds received in battle, and other medical problems encountered on the trail, as well as general information about the day-to-day activities of the soldiers. Located at the end of the report is a chart detailing the medical problems of the regiment, including the number of cases of dysentery, gonorrhea, pneumonia, ulcers, burns, and sprains (among many others). At the end of these charts, Bailey expresses his appreciation to the commanders of the regiment, thanking them for following his medical advice and showing concern for the health of their soldiers.

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Territorial Census, 1855, District 6

Barbee, William

This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, gender, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over twenty-one were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. There was a summary of voters in the 6th district at the end of the enumeration. For District Six, the place of election was the house of H. T. Wilson, at Fort Scott. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation, and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The description of the Sixth District follows: "Commencing on the Missouri State line, in Little Osage River; thence up the same to the line of the reserve of the New York Indians, or to the nearest point thereto; thence to and by the north line of said reserve to the Neosho River, and up said southern line of the Territory; thence by the southern and eastern lines of said Territory to the place of beginning."

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

On the first day of the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, Ingalls wrote from Wyandotte, Kansas, with observation on the city and the nature of the convention, which he considered "not a very superior one." Nevertheless, the Republicans had a big majority, and Ingalls was "on some of the most important committees in the convention and shall be obliged to do some hard work."

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Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Nute, Ephraim

Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute observed that Francis Serenbetz, a German Congregational minister, and his party of thirty German immigrants were in Lawrence and getting ready to head south to establish a colony on the Neosho River that they planned to name Humboldt. Nute was not optimistic that the Serenbetz party would succeed due to their lack of financial resources. Nute commented that immigration into Kansas continued to increase and estimated that nearly 1,000 people per day entered the territory. He stated that most of the new immigrants were from Western states and "of the right kind to stay." Nute also commented on the lack of saw and grist mills in the territory and blamed the New England Emigrant Aid Company for the deficiency.

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Territorial Census, 1855, District 8

McClure, J. R.

This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, gender, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over twenty-one were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. A statistical summary of the census followed the enumeration pages. For District 8, the place of election was the house of Ingraham Baker, on the Santa Fe Road. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation, and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The description of the Eighth District follows: "Commencing at the mouth of Elm Creek, one of the branches of Osage River; thence up the same to the Santa Fe road; thence by a direct northerly line to the southwest corner of the Pottawatomie reservation; thence up the western line thereof to the Kansas River; thence up said river and the Smoky Hill Fork, beyond the most westerly settlements; thence due south to the line of the territory; thence by the same to the line of the Sixth District; thence due north to the head of the south branch of the Neosho River; thence down said river to the lines of the Seventh District; thence due north to the place of beginning."

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory, where hundreds of free state supporters were gathering for a Mass Convention on the 3rd and meeting of the free state legislature on the 4th, to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. Cyrus reported that U. S. dragoons from Fort Leavenworth and Fort Riley were camped around Topeka, since difficulty was expected. [In fact, U. S. and proslavery troops dispersed the free state legislature on the 4th.) Two companies of northern immigrants had been turned back at the Missouri River. Cyrus seemed skeptical that effective action would be taken against this outrage.

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Walter Pearce Hull photograph collection

Walter Pearce Hull, 1870-1956

This series of photographs was taken by Walter Pearce Hull. He was born November 22, 1870, in Eyota, Minnesota, grew up in Athens, Alabama, and moved to Kansas as a young man. His parents were Joseph Gould Hull, born May 4, 1840 in Orangeville, Ohio and Eliza Jane Westfall, born October 29, 1847 in Bushnell, Illinois. By 1894 he was manager of the Northrup Store in Colony. He served as a 1st Lt. In the 20th Kansas Infantry, U.S. Volunteers, 1898-99, during the Philippine-American War, serving on Frederick Funston's staff. He returned to Iola after he was discharged and was manager of the Northrup store there. Hull was a skilled amateur photographer. Many of the photos were taken while he was courting Lenna Myrtle Jolliffe, 1908-1909. They married December 22, 1909 in Bentonville, Arkansas. They lived at 420 S. Washington Street, Iola and had three children: Harriet, born September 29, 1910, Berrien Jolliffe, born October 15, 1913, and Lenna Doris, born December 3, 1915.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from "Up the River," Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania, describing the difficult living conditions for him and the other men at the future site of Topeka, where they had been visited by Governor Andrew H. Reeder. Holliday assured his wife of his health and requested that she explain to Mr. Drew Lowry and Mr. McFarland in Pennsylvania why he had not written. He praised the beauty of the country and expressed his vision of its future, ending with a request that she write to him.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, the founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He told her of his planned trip up the Kansas River, his pleasure in the people of Kansas Territory, and a Thanksgiving dinner he attended. Unwilling to return to Pennsylvania, Holliday expressed desire that Mary come to Kansas Territory and described the construction of a friend's sod-covered "mansion," one such as Clarina I. H. Nichols, a lecturer and writer, inhabited.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Ingalls devoted much of his April 3, 1860, letter from Sumner to the territory's agricultural prospects, which were still not particularly good: "Corn, pork, and hides" were Kansas's only exports, and they were not very profitable as prices were low. "Considerable attention," wrote Ingalls, "is being paid to the hemp crop" and the wheat seemed to be doing pretty well; various kinds of fruit also "flourishes. . . . I have never seen finer apples than the farmers across the river bring to market. . . . But little is raised in Kansas yet, though much attention is being given to 'orchardizing' this spring." Ingalls was actually considering a move to the Gold County (Colorado) for better business prospects.

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