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Page 1 of 5, showing 10 records out of 50 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Jonathan Crews to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Crews, Jonathan

Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

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Thomas Ewing, Jr. to William S. Reyburn

In his capacity as attorney for H. B. Denman, who had just "bought of [John A.] Halderman the interest of the latter in the ferry, Ewing wrote to Reyburn, of Philadelphia, to encourage "an amicable settlement" to avoid taking their disagreement to court. The nature of their dispute was not entirely clear, but Ewing insisted that if not settled it could undermine the legitimacy of the ferry company's charter in the eyes of the soon to be constituted State government.

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Dan Lykins and Roger Fincher

Lykins, Judy

Three photographs of Dan Lykins and Roger Fincher, Topeka attorneys, at the American Trial Lawyers Conference in Chicago, Illinois. They are posed with three political figures/Presidential candidates John Edwards, Howard Dean and Bill Richardson.

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Dan Lykins at the National Trial Lawyers Association meeting in Washington, D.C.

A photograph showing Dan Lykins (far right), a prominent Topeka attorney and member of the Kansas Board of Regents with (left to right) Governors Bill Richardson, New Mexico; Kathleen Sebelius, Kansas; Brian Schweitzer, Montana; and Christine Gregoire, Washington at the National Trail Lawyers Association in Washington, D.C.

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Williard Davis

Mullen

This cabinet card shows Willard Davis, who served as Kansas' 10th Attorney General from January 8, 1877 to January 10, 1881. He was born January 26, 1837 in Madison County, Kentucky. He attended Missouri University, then studied law at Lexington, Kentucky, and was admitted to practice there. When the war began, he was commissioned into the Union army as a Lieutenant in the Thirty-First Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, but his military career was brief due to failing health. On March 14, 1863, Davis was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as the Internal Revenue Collector for Kentucky. He held the position until September 1, 1866 when he was dismissed for failure to accept President Andrew Johnson's policies. Davis resumed his law career and advocated for civil rights for freed slaves. In the fall of 1870, Davis moved to Neosho Falls, Kansas and became the attorney for the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. The following year he settled in Parsons, Kansas and was elected the town's first mayor. To focus on his political career, he resigned from the railroad in 1873. In 1874, he was elected county attorney for Labette County, Kansas. He held this office until he was elected in 1876 to serve as Attorney General for the State of Kansas. After two terms he returned to his private law practice. On December 6, 1885 at the age of forty-eight, he passed away after a lengthy illness at his home at Eleventh and Van Buren Street in Topeka, Kansas.

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Temperance history correspondence

This correspondence was sent and received by Frank M. Stahl, superintendent of the Kansas State Temperance Union. A letter from James K. Shields, state superintendent for the Anti-Saloon League of Illinois, asks for Stahl's assistance in recruiting Governor Walter R. Stubbs for a temperance rally in Springfield, Illinois, in opposition to the "United Societies boozers of Chicago." A letter from J. F. Baker, legislative superintendent for the Wisconsin Anti-Saloon League seeks information about prohibitory zones around Kansas universities as the state of Wisconsin attempts to exclude saloons from the college town of Madison. Correspondence with W. H. Edmundson and E. D. Mikesell, attorneys in Fredonia, regards the selling and prosecution of "Belgian Beer" which supposedly contained one-half of one percent of alcohol and was sold by children at lemonade stands. Stahl responded that "the internal revenue collectors have rather overstepped their duties." Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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Robert T. Stephan with President Ronald Reagan

This is a photograph of Robert T. Stephan shaking hands with President Ronald Reagan. After graduating from Washburn University's law school, Robert T. Stephan practiced law in Wichita, Kansas. From 1965 to 1978, he was a district court judge in Wichita, Kansas. In 1979, he was elected Kansas Attorney General and he served in that office for 16 years. He helped craft and eventually win passage of the 1992 Victims' Rights Amendment. The legislation established a compensation fund, crime victims' board, community grants, and revised sentencing guidelines in Kansas. After leaving office, he moved to Lenexa, Kansas, and worked as a corporate legal consultant, dealing principally in consumer protection matters and federal trade commission rules in regard to marketing. Stephan has received many awards for his service to the state and community.

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Robert T. Stephan with President Bill Clinton

This is a photograph of Kansas Attorney General Robert T. Stephan shaking hands with United States President Bill Clinton. After graduating from Washburn University's law school, Robert T. Stephan practiced law in Wichita, Kansas. From 1965 to 1978, he was a district court judge in Wichita, Kansas. In 1979, he was elected Kansas Attorney General and he served in that office for 16 years. He helped craft and eventually win passage of the 1992 Victims' Rights Amendment. The legislation established a compensation fund, crime victims' board, community grants, and revised sentencing guidelines in Kansas. After leaving office, he moved to Lenexa, Kansas, and worked as a corporate legal consultant, dealing principally in consumer protection matters and federal trade commission rules in regard to marketing. Stephan has received many awards for his service to the state and community.

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Robert T. Stephan with President George H. W. Bush

This is a photograph of Kansas Attorney General Robert T. Stephan shaking hands with United States President George H. W. Bush. After graduating from Washburn University's law school, Robert T. Stephan practiced law in Wichita, Kansas. From 1965 to 1978, he was a district court judge in Wichita, Kansas. In 1979, he was elected Kansas Attorney General and he served in that office for 16 years. He helped craft and eventually win passage of the 1992 Victims' Rights Amendment. The legislation established a compensation fund, crime victims' board, community grants, and revised sentencing guidelines in Kansas. After leaving office, he moved to Lenexa, Kansas, and worked as a corporate legal consultant, dealing principally in consumer protection matters and federal trade commission rules in regard to marketing. Stephan has received many awards for his service to the state and community.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows governors gathered for a celebration in Amarillo, Texas. In the middle is Jas V. Allred of Texas with Erest W. Marland of Oklahom and Teller Ammons of Colorado to his left; and Clyde Tingley of New Mexico and Walter Huxman of Kansas on the right.

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