Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Farmers (Remove)
Government and Politics (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 1 of 7, showing 10 records out of 65 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Alfred Gray

Leonard & Martin

A photograph of Alfred Gray, who was born in Evans, New York. In March 1857 Gray made the decision to immigrate to Kansas, where, at the age of 26, he settled in Quindaro, opening a law and real estate office. Soon, however, Gray chose to return to the occupation of his father, and he ultimately built one of the best farms in Wyandotte County. Gray was chief clerk of the territorial legislature and was elected to the first state legislature; in April 1862 he entered the army and served as a regimental quartermaster with the Fifth Kansas Cavalry and the 10th Kansas Infantry regiments. Gray is best known for his post-Civil War activities. He served as director of the State Agricultural Society from 1866 to 1870 and was elected secretary of the State Board of Agriculture in 1872, serving in this capacity until his death in 1880.

previewthumb

After the great war is over

This promotional brochure argues that the construction of good roads in the United States will enhance agricultural productivity and economic development in the aftermath of World War I.

previewthumb

Richard West to John P. St. John

Richard West, a resident of Barton Station, Alabama, wrote this letter to Kansas governor St. John requesting information about available land in Kansas. West was a farmer who described in some detail many of the concerns facing emigrants, including transportation and other expenses. In addition to his role as governor of Kansas, St. John also served on the Board of Directors of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

previewthumb

Kansas Territory citizens to the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America

This unsigned statement was written to protest "the practice of taxing the people of the Territories for the support of a Government in which they are not represented." The residents of Kansas Territory complained that they had had no voice in how these tax dollars were appropriated, and they asked this "honorable body" to remit to them these taxes. Since this was during the drought of 1860, they declared that they would use these funds for famine relief.

previewthumb

Settlers on Little Sugar Creek

Stewart, John E.

This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

previewthumb

Ralph Stum and John Wunder

Capper Engraving Co.

This black and white photograph shows Ralph Strum, on the left, talking with John Wunder from Bazine, Kansas about weeds at the Ness County Noxious Weed Department.

previewthumb

Kansas Farmer Seed Wheat Club history collection

Kansas Farmer Seed Wheat Club

This collection consists of records from the Kansas Farmer Seed Wheat Club. It includes correspondence, index cards by county noting how much was deposited in each bank, what was outstanding and what had been paid, and other miscellaneous materials. The correspondence and other materials all regard the logistics of purchasing, shipping, and distributing the seed wheat, as well as monitoring how the crops fared and that loans were repaid. Frequent correspondents include Culver D. Yetter, secretary of the Kansas Farmer Seed Wheat Club, and Charles Manville Sawyer, state bank commissioner who became the first president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

previewthumb

Where Kansas stands

This good roads promotional brochure published by the Kansas Good Roads Association argues that Kansas' position as a national leader in farm production makes good roads a necessity.

previewthumb

James M. Hunter to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Hunter, James M.

James M. Hunter, writing from Westport, Missouri, informed Thomas N. Stinson about a joint land speculation deal involving lots in Tecumseh, KT. Hunter alluded to Governor Andrew Reeder's involvement in the speculative venture.

previewthumb

The Grangers' dream of cheap money

Puck

This political cartoon from the satirical Puck magazine illustrates the Republican perception of the People?s (Populist) Party belief in the coinage of silver and the redistribution of wealth to the masses. In the cartoon, Populist senator William Peffer uses a bellows to propel the windmill of the U.S. Treasury in order to pump out more ?greenbacks.? Outside the windmill, farmers are hungrily grabbing bags of money and carting them away in wagons. Billboards in the nearby town refer to the rapid inflation caused by the distribution of so much money.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7|

Government and Politics

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Date

Education

Environment

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

People

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation

Type of Material