Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Community Life (Remove)
Type of Material -- Printed materials (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Objects and Artifacts (Remove)
Places -- Other States (Remove)
Date (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
People (Remove)
Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 15 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Spanish Fandango

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

Guitarist Henry Worrall published his arrangement of the celebrated solo guitar instrumental "Spanish Fandango" about 1866 with J.L. Peters & Bros., music publisher, of St. Louis, Missouri. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

previewthumb

After twenty-one years: the success story of Dr. John R. Brinkley

Brinkley Hospitals

This booklet was published by the Brinkley Hospitals of Little Rock, Arkansas. Brinkley moved his hospital operations to Little Rock from Milford, Kansas, after his Kansas medical license was revoked. He changed the name of his radio station to XERA and it was located in Villa Acuna, Mexico, just across the border from Del Rio, Texas, where the Brinkley's had a home. The pamphlet is a revised version of an earlier Brinkley hospital publication titled Your Health (Kansas Memory item 210693). It includes illustrations to accompany the medical information.

previewthumb

Medley of airs

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

Several instrumental pieces by Henry Worrall are included here within a series of solo guitar pieces published by J.L. Peters & Bro. of St. Louis, Missouri. This copy of that collection includes only Worrall's "Medley of Airs" and is from his personal music collection. The medley includes the following songs: "Whal be King but Charlie," "Spanish Dance," "Gliding Jessy," "Fisher's Hornpipe," "Celebrated Spanish Serenade," and "Smith's West End Serenade." The title page includes the inscription "From Mama [Mary E. Harvey Worrall], March 9th, 1903, 715 Polk St, Topeka." In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

previewthumb

Worrall's guitar school

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

In the 1850s, guitarist Henry Worrall published this popular guitar tutorial with W.C. Peters & Sons of Cincinnati, Ohio. By the 1880s, Worrall had acquired copyright to the publication and issued a reprint with the Oliver Ditson Company of Boston, Massachusetts. The tutorial includes instructions, exercises, and popular music for playing solo acoustic guitar. Special instructions for playing Worrall's celebrated "Sebastopol" are also included. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868, and remained there until his death in 1902.

previewthumb

Dr. Brinkley's doctor book

Brinkley Hospitals

This booklet was published by the Brinkley Hospitals of Little Rock, Arkansas. Brinkley moved his hospital operations to Little Rock from Milford, Kansas, after his Kansas medical license was revoked. The cover of the booklet indicated that the Brinkley Hospitals are "for the treatment of enlarged and infected prostate glands, rectal and colonic diseases, varicose veins, hernia, or rupture." He changed the name of his radio station to XERA and it was located in Villa Acuna, Coahuila, Mexico, just across the border from Del Rio, Texas, where the Brinkley's had a home. This volume claims that XERA is the most powerful radio station in the world. The pamphlet is a revised version of an earlier Brinkley hospital publication titled Your Health (Kansas Memory item 210693). It includes illustrations to accompany the medical information. There are some editing marks so this copy may have been used to plan a revision. It is an expansion of the information contained in "After Twenty One Years" (Kansas Memory item 213226).

previewthumb

Worrall's celebrated Mexican air. A capretio for the guitar

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

Henry Worrall publishes his celebrated solo guitar instrumental "Mexican Air" with Oliver Ditson & Co. of Boston, Massachusetts. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

previewthumb

Fantasia on Lucy Long

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

A guitar instrumental by Henry Worrall is included here within a series of solo guitar pieces published by J.L. Peters & Bro. of St. Louis, Missouri. This copy of that collection includes only the "Fantasia on Lucy Long." In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

previewthumb

Sebastopol. A descriptive fantaisie for the guitar, by Henry Worrall

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

Henry Worrall composed and arranged Sebastopol, a solo parlor guitar piece, and published it in 1860 with A.C. Peters & J.L. Peters, music publishers, Cincinnati, Ohio. The piece was very popular throughout the nineteenth century. Worrall intended the piece to be an imitation of a military bugle and band. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

previewthumb

Celebrated violet waltz varied for the guitar

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

Guitarist Henry Worrall published his solo instrumental "Violet Waltz" with W.C. Peters & Sons of Cincinnati, Ohio. This copy comes from Worrall's personal collection. The many penciled notations included throughout this copy are presumed to be Worrall's. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

previewthumb

Worrall's select melodies

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

A guitar instrumental by Henry Worrall is included here within a series of solo guitar pieces published by J.L. Peters & Bro. of St. Louis, Missouri. Worrall's select melodies include "Prince William's Gallop" and "Princes Henrietta's Waltz." In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2|