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Page 1 of 72, showing 10 records out of 719 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Lawson Wilson to Lewis Allen Alderson

These three letters are from Lawson Wilson in Lincoln County, North Carolina, to his friend, Lewis Allen Alderson, a student at the University of Ohio in Athens. In his letters, Wilson reminisces about time spent in Athens and seeks news about his old acquaintances. Wilson states that "Nullification has been making a great noise in the South," regarding the ability of individual states to abolish federal laws, particularly relating to tariffs and slave laws in South Carolina. He also mentions that the gold mines in the region are making "a great bustle" and congratulates Alderson on his recent marriage. Alderson moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

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Dorothea Dix correspondence

Dix, Dorothea Lynde, 1802-1887

Dorothea Dix's papers consist of correspondence from Miss Dix to various people, as well as some correspondence in which Miss Dix was concerned, but not directly involved. Dix was an advocate for social welfare, particularly supporting the establishment and maintenance of mental hospitals for the mentally ill, disabled, or poor. She was instrumental in the proposed legislation of the "Bill for the Benefit of the Indigent Insane." During the Civil War, Dix was appointed Superintendent of Army Nurses. Much of the correspondence concerns Dix's efforts to bring lifeboats and other help to Sable Island in Nova Scotia, an area known for shipwrecks and where many with mental illnesses were sent, sometimes against their will. These papers are part of the historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives.

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Fern Gayden

This is a photograph of Fern Gayden possibly taken in Dunlap, Kansas. Fern Gayden was born September 29, 1904, in Dunlap, Kansas, where she attended elementary and secondary schools. She went on to attend Kansas State Teachers College at Emporia and taught school for one year. Fern Gayden moved to Chicago at the age of 23. She had a 50-year career as a social worker but became best known as a literary, fine arts, and political activist. A founding member of the South Side Writers Group in the 1930s, Fern Gayden's long and diverse career included leadership roles in the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and the South Side Community Art Center. During World War II, she co-published Negro Story magazine with Alice Browning.

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Lone Pine

Coy Avon Seward

Black and white intaglio print on paper, depicting a single pine tree in a rocky terrain. The artist was Coy Avon Seward (1884-1939), born in Chase, Kansas, and trained at both Washburn and Bethany colleges. Seward was a founding member of the Prairie Print Makers Association. This group believed art should be affordable for all people. Seward inscribed this print to the donor, Virginia McArthur of Hutchinson, who saw Seward produce the print in 1934.

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Isabel Erickson, Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas

Isabel Erickson attended the Menninger School of Psychiatric Nursing. She is shown in her nurse's uniform, cap and cape. The Menninger Clinic was created to care for individuals with mood, personality, anxiety and addictive disorders, as well as teaching mental health professionals and advancing mental healthcare through research.

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Garfield School, Topeka, Kansas

Three black and white photographs of Garfield School in Topeka, Kansas, serving as an emergency hospital, possibly during the Spanish Influenza epidemic.

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Office of William C. Menninger, M.D.

This black and white photograph shows Dr. Will's office in the original Menninger Clinic, the converted farmhouse. Dr. Will, his brother Dr. Karl, and his father Dr. C. F. Menninger established the Menninger Clinic as a sanitarium in 1925 with the purchase of a farm house and admittance of 12 patients. Their philosophy was that mental illness could be treated with an integrated medical, psychodynamic, and developmental approach for the total health of patients

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United States astronauts, Frankfort, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows a group of U. S. astronauts at Dan Horigan's home north of Frankfort, Kansas. The astronauts came to Kansas to hunt on the Horigan farm. Back row (left to right): Neil Armstrong, Stuart Rossa, William Anders, James Lovell and Donald K "Deke" Slayton. Front row (left to right): Kansas native Ron Evans, Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, Gordon Cooper, and Charles Duke.

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Kansas City Monarchs

This black and white photograph shows members of the Kansas City Monarchs baseball team. The franchise was organized in 1920 and located in Kansas City, Missouri. It became the longest running Negro League team in the United States before disbanding in 1965.

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Anna Freud lecturing at the Menninger Clinic, Topeka, Kansas

Anna Freud lectures at the Menninger School of Psychiatry 20th reunion. Karl Menninger, MD, is joining her in laughter. Menninger is a leading psychiatric hospital dedicated to treating individuals with mood, personality, anxiety and addictive disorders, teaching mental health professionals and advancing mental healthcare through research. Once located in Topeka, Kansas, they relocated in 2003 to Houston, Texas.

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