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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 18 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Mrs. D.F. Robison to Horace Greeley

Robison, Mrs. D. F.

This brief letter, written by Mrs. D. F. Robison of Green Castle, Pennsylvania, was addressed to Horace Greeley, informing him of her small but unselfish contribution to Kansas relief. It is an excellent example of how even Northerners who were struggling financially took it upon themselves to aid the impoverished settlers of Kansas.

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Unknown to Horace Greeley

This letter, written from Montrose, Pennsylvania, was addressed to Horace Greeley. It included a contribution of two dollars, which the author asked to be passed along to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

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Kansas Relief Committee, newspaper article

Smith, I. N.

This article, published in the Haverhill, Massachusetts Tri-Weekly Publisher, lists the contributions collected by their local Kansas Relief Committee. A number of different churches in the area donated cash, and the committee also sent varied articles of clothing (listed in the article) to General S.C. Pomeroy of Atchison.

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William Addison Phillips

Portrait of William Addison Phillips, an author, lawyer, journalist and politician. In 1857, Phillips attended the Constitution Convention at Topeka and the Free State Conventions at Centropolis, Lawrence, and Grasshopper Falls. He founded the town of Salina in April, 1858. In that same month and year, Phillips was nominated at the Topeka Free-State Convention under the Leavenworth Constitution to serve as a supreme court judge. He attended the Convention at Osawatomie and the Republican State Convention at Lawrence in 1859. Phillips served in the Kansas Volunteer Regiments and rose to the rank of colonel. From March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875 Phillips was an at large representative to the United States Congress and from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1879 he represented the First District.

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Friendship quilt

Chintz friendship quilt in Broderie Perse style. Blocks are appliquéd with chintz cut-outs of floral sprays, wreaths, garlands, and a few animals. Hand-stitched, appliqued, and quilted. Each block is inked with a signature; most of these people were listed as residents of James Island, South Carolina, in the 1860 census. Reverend George T. Holyoke found this quilt in a Union army camp during the Civil War when he was a private in the 45th Illinois Infantry. This may have occurred in South Carolina where the 45th closed out the war on Sherman?s March. After the war, Holyoke became a Congregational minister and moved to Kansas with his wife.

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Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook and their three eldest children. He was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon, Lawrence, Kansas.

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Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook with three children and their dog. Cook was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon of Lawrence, Kansas.

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John Stillman Brown to John L. Rupur

Brown, John Stillman, 1806-1902

This letter was written by John Stillman Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to John L. Rupur. Brown gives a detailed and emotional account of William Quantrill's August 21, 1863, raid on Lawrence. Brown lists individual men and groups such as African Americans and Germans who were killed in the attack. He witnessed much of the violence from a hill above the city, and describes the destruction of life and property. Brown mentions that the town had no warning before the attack and that there was a second panic the following evening when townspeople feared another raid. He also describes how the community's churches came together for a memorial service. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.

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William Brown to Sarah Brown

Brown, William

This letter, written by William Brown from Topeka, Kansas, was addressed to his sister, Sarah Brown, in Lawrence. William and Sarah were children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. William discussed a Baptist church service in Topeka and the recent Kansas State Fair. The latter part of the letter discusses political issues, including recent elections and fear that the "bushwackers" may attack Leavenworth or Fort Scott.

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M.R. Brown to William Brown

Brown, Mary Ripley, d. 1878

A letter written from Lawrence, Kansas, by M.R. Brown, addressed to her son, William Brown, who was in college in New York. Brown begins by discussing the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. She discusses the 300 African Americans who had fled slavery and were now living in Lawrence, and the efforts of an African-American minister in the community. Brown expresses fear that Lawrence would be attacked by Missourians. She also gives news of Leigh R. Webber, a Kansas soldier who often wrote to members of the Brown family.

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