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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 38 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Charles Monroe Sheldon

Charles Monroe Sheldon, pastor of Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, organized the first Black kindergarten west of the Mississippi River. It was known as the Tennesseetown Kindergarten. He is best known for his novel "In His Steps" or "What Would Jesus Do?"

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Circular letter no.1 from the Kansas State Board of Health

This letter explains the duty of the health officers and physicians of the state to report deaths to the State Board of Health or be fined $10.

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Tea service

This silver tea set was given to Reverend Joseph E. and Nancy Jane (McPherson) Hopkins for their 25th wedding anniversary in 1903. The couple moved to Kansas from Illinois in the late 1870s. Their religious service took them to a number of churches around the state. In 1903, they served at the Methodist Church in Sedan where church members presented them with this tea service for their silver wedding anniversary. The set was put to good use the following year when the Hopkins hosted temperance advocate Carry A. Nation for lunch at their home.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence sent and received by Rev. Robert Norris, secretary of the Kansas State Temperance Union, and Julian K. Codding, attorney for the Kansas State Temperance Union. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson and Minnie Wood, presidents of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. J. M. Dunlavy, president of the Crawford County Civil League and Third Congressional District of the KSTU, Rev. J. W. Primrose, superintendent of the Second Congressional District of the KSTU in Fort Scott, John Wiswell, chairman of the Cherokee County Law Enforcement Aid Committee, and representatives from the Anti-Saloon League of America. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to advance anti-liquor agendas in local, state, and national politics. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence sent and received by the Kansas State Temperance Union (KSTU). Rev. Robert Norris acted as secretary, John Marshall, attorney, and Julian K. Codding, attorney and later president of the Kansas State Temperance Union. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson, president of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. J.M. Dunlavy, superintendent of the Third Congressional District of the KSTU, Rev. J.W. Primrose, superintendent of the Second Congressional District of the KSTU, Mary Evelyn Dobbs, president of the Third District of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, the Kansas State Prohibition Committee, and representatives from the Anti-Saloon League of America. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to advance anti-liquor agendas in local, state, and national politics. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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Historic Psychiatry original miscellaneous documents

These are a variety of handwritten and typed letters, lectures, autographs, news clippings, biographical information, images and sketches, court documents, and other documents related to the history of psychiatry. These documents are housed in four boxes and the folders within are arranged alphabetically by surname or title, and they are included in the larger collection of historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives. Authors come from such fields as medicine, religion, prison and other reform and advocacy movements, politics, the military, etc. The documents themselves sometimes provide significant information, and sometimes they were collected because their authors were significant historical figures. Some of the individuals found in Box 1 include James Mark Baldwin, Ludwig Binswanger, Eugen Bleuler, Jean-Martin Charcot, Elizabeth Fry, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Carl Jung. Some of the individuals found in Box 2 include Alfred Adler, Robert Frost, and Washinton Irving. This box also includes a 68-page handwritten notebook by Dr. W.W. Reed entitled "Reminiscenses About the Treatment of the Insane." Some of the individuals found in Box 3 include Amariah Brigham and Frederick van Eeden. This box also includes a correspondence file (1883-1888) on Ellen Kehoe, a patient at the Worcester Lunatic Hospital in Massachusetts, and a series of drawings from the 1920s and 1930s by a Belgian patient suffering from paranoia named Andreas at the Kankakee State Hospital in Illinois. The drawings were donated by Dr. J.B. Gier, formerly of the Topeka Veteran's Administration Hospital, who knew the patient and encouraged his work. Box 4 includes a miscellaneous folder regarding insane asylums and contains legal documents, postcard images, and receipts for services. Languages include English, German, French and Italian, and transcriptions or translations follow some of the documents.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence relating to the Kansas State Temperance Union and its activities promoting the enforcement of prohibition in the state of Kansas. Frank M. Stahl served as superintendent and John Marshall served as attorney. They wrote a number of the letters contained in this collection. Leaders of the temperance movement frequently corresponded with county attorneys, civic leaders, ministers, and pastors. Included are several letters supporting James A. Lyons of Langdon, Kansas, who was charged with selling intoxicating liquors, and a circular announcing the guilty verdict in the case of Assistant Attorney General C. W. Trickett of Wyandotte County, Kansas, who accepted illegal fees in the prosecution of liquor cases. The collection contains correspondence from numerous Kansas communities.

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Rural mail carriers, Oakley, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows three rural mail carriers with their motorcycles in front of the post office at Oakley, Kansas. Two of the motorcycles have Thor IV written across the tank.

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Samuel Jay Crumbine

Dr. Samuel Crumbine in the State Board of Health office with his assistants Warren Crumbine and Bernice Vreeland.

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Walter Pearce Hull photograph collection

Walter Pearce Hull, 1870-1956

This series of photographs was taken by Walter Pearce Hull. He was born November 22, 1870, in Eyota, Minnesota, grew up in Athens, Alabama, and moved to Kansas as a young man. His parents were Joseph Gould Hull, born May 4, 1840 in Orangeville, Ohio and Eliza Jane Westfall, born October 29, 1847 in Bushnell, Illinois. By 1894 he was manager of the Northrup Store in Colony. He served as a 1st Lt. In the 20th Kansas Infantry, U.S. Volunteers, 1898-99, during the Philippine-American War, serving on Frederick Funston's staff. He returned to Iola after he was discharged and was manager of the Northrup store there. Hull was a skilled amateur photographer. Many of the photos were taken while he was courting Lenna Myrtle Jolliffe, 1908-1909. They married December 22, 1909 in Bentonville, Arkansas. They lived at 420 S. Washington Street, Iola and had three children: Harriet, born September 29, 1910, Berrien Jolliffe, born October 15, 1913, and Lenna Doris, born December 3, 1915.

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