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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 21 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Charles Arbuckle to Lewis Allen Alderson

These four letters are from Charles Arbuckle to Lewis Allen Alderson. Arbuckle writes from Alderson's hometown of Lewisburg, West Virginia. In the letters, Arbuckle encourages Alderson to propose to Miss Lucy B. Miles, whom Alderson marries the day after he graduates from the University of Ohio in 1832. Arbuckle states that "an amiable woman next to religion is man's greatest consolation" but he seeks to remain a bachelor himself. Arbuckle also attended the Staunton Convention leading up to the election of 1832. Alderson later moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

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William Hutchinson to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Hutchinson, William , 1823-1904

William B. Hutchinson, an abolitionist from Lawrence, Kansas Territory and secretary of the Freemen of Kansas, wrote to Cyrus K. Holliday, free state activist and president of the Topeka Town Association, informing him of his appointment to a secret committee. The fifty-two members were to gather and turn in evidence against those responsible for election fraud. Holliday had also been appointed to the fund-raising subcommittee. In a later written response, Holliday refused these appointments, referring to time-consuming family and business responsibilities.

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Henry Woods to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Woods, Henry

Henry Woods, member of the Township Meetings and Speakers committee of the Fremont Club, asked Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, give an address that evening in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Holliday had returned to his home state to speak on behalf of Republican presidential nominee John Charles Fremont, who supported the free state cause. Woods' brief letter was written on the back of a printed list of subcommittees of the Fremont County Executive Committee. Evidentially, Woods had enclosed with the letter a note from G. E. Appleton of Birmingham, which requested that Holliday speak there the following day.

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William Y. Roberts and Samuel Clarke Pomeroy to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Roberts, William Y

William Y. Roberts and Samuel C. Pomeroy reported their activities from Willard's, a hotel popular with wealthy congressmen in Washington, D. C., to Cyrus K. Holliday in Topeka, Kansas Territory. They described the legislators' and President Franklin Pierce's eagerness to resolve K. T. troubles. While approving the July 4th meeting of the free state legislature, they cautioned Holliday to promote peace.

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Elect Vern Miller, Democrat sheriff

A political advertisement for Vern Miller, who was the Democratic candidate for Sedgwick County Sheriff, Wichita, Kansas.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Charles Robinson to Amos Adams Lawrence

Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894

Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts. Robinson thanked Lawrence for his unfailing support of the enterprise of the Territory and claimed his devotion to work done in his interest. He discussed Lawrence's development, having secured the offices of three free state newspapers, but expressed anxiety about the upcoming territorial election. However, Robinson vowed that his men would not resort to fraudulent voting to win the majority over proslavery supporters.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, reelected on the 6th for a third six-month term as president of the Topeka Town Association, wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He had been appointed to visit Washington by the Free State Executive Committee and nominated for territorial Secretary of State (losing in the January 15th election). Cyrus had received the money drafts Mary sent. He reported cold, stormy weather.

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William Brown to Sarah Brown

Brown, William

This letter, written by William Brown from Topeka, Kansas, was addressed to his sister, Sarah Brown, in Lawrence. William and Sarah were children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. William discussed a Baptist church service in Topeka and the recent Kansas State Fair. The latter part of the letter discusses political issues, including recent elections and fear that the "bushwackers" may attack Leavenworth or Fort Scott.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, advised his wife in Meadville, Pennsylvania concerning travel. He restated advice from his much longer letter of September 26th. He wrote of his nomination, yet to be confirmed by vote, as a delegate to the Topeka Constitutional Convention. Holliday decided to decline the editorship of The Kansas Freeman. He expressed sympathy for Lizzie Holliday, his wife's sister, and suggested boarding when Mary Holliday and their daughter Lillie arrived, as he had not yet built a house.

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