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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 26 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

You asked about Topeka

Topeka Chamber of Commerce

This film promotes Topeka, Kansas, as a prosperous government, business, and cultural center, and encourages viewers to move to Topeka. The film highlights many aspects of the community including government and public services, business and industry, agriculture, education, hospitals, churches and entertainment. It showcases the Westboro neighborhood; Kansas Avenue; Gage Park; the State Capitol and the legislature; Cyrus Holiday and the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad; Goodyear Tire Co.; Dupont; Forbes Air Force base; Lake Shawnee; Washburn University; the Topeka Public Library; the Kansas History Museum; Topeka and Topeka West high schools; the Veterans Hospital; Karl Menninger and the Menninger Foundation; and the State Hospital among other aspects of the city.

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John W. Robinson to Hiram Hill

Robinson, John W

John Robinson, President and Agent of the Manhattan Town Association, wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Robinson responded to Hill's interest in investing in the town, describing the town's current situation, climate, and development rate. He provided specific and dramatic examples of increasing property values, and assured Hill that there would be no land speculation; he would only sell lots to those investors who were willing to build.

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Settlers on Little Sugar Creek

Stewart, John E.

This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

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Anton T. Boisen papers

Boisen, Anton T. (Anton Theophilus), 1876-1965

These papers include correspondence with Professor Seward Hiltner of Princeton Theological School, hand-illustrated poetry written by various individuals, newsletters from the Elgin State Hospital, manuscripts, and course lectures. Boisen spent time in Wabaunsee, Kansas while surveying rural churches, including the Congregational Church. Boisen was secretary of the Wabaunsee Neighborhood Association and wrote about the "Health Conditions in the Wabaunsee Community." Also included are annual reports (1933-1935) to the directors of the Chicago Council for the Clinical Training of Theological Students which include several photographs of students at the Elgin State Hospital, where Boisen was the chaplain from 1932-1954.

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DAR markers at Ottawa Indian Burial Grounds, Kansas

Five photographs of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) markers at the Ottawa Indian Burial Grounds, east of Ottawa, honoring Jotham Meeker, John Tecumseh Jones, Chief Comechau and Notino, the Medicine Man.

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Samuel Newell Simpson to Hiram Hill

Simpson, Samuel Newell

S. N. Simpson wrote from Kansas City, Missouri to Hiram Hill in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts, where Edmund Jones had recently returned (see Hill's letter to Jones of October 11, 1855). Simpson described development and rising property values in Lawrence. He detailed his attempts to collect rent from Mrs. Hall, who had cleaned in exchange for a month's rent. In language reminiscent of documents from the American Revolution, the last paragraph declared that Kansas could but would not break ties with the United States, partly because Kansas needed financial assistance. As evidence, Simpson asked Hill for church-building funds.

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Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Nute, Ephraim

Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute inquired about the possibility of Hale arranging a loan of $2000 at reasonable interest for the completion of the Unitarian Church in Lawrence. He reported on the high rates of interest being charged for loans in Kansas Territory and on the general effects of the panic of 1857 on the territorial economy. Nute also expressed his dissatisfaction with the Buchanan administration's handling of the Lecompton Constitution and his hope that a change in presidential administration in 1860 would result in Kansas' admission as a free state.

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Chippewa, Ottawa and Munsee Indian cemeteries in Franklin County Kansas

Four photographs from the Chippewa, Ottawa and Munsee Indian Cemeteries.

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Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Nute, Ephraim

Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute observed that Francis Serenbetz, a German Congregational minister, and his party of thirty German immigrants were in Lawrence and getting ready to head south to establish a colony on the Neosho River that they planned to name Humboldt. Nute was not optimistic that the Serenbetz party would succeed due to their lack of financial resources. Nute commented that immigration into Kansas continued to increase and estimated that nearly 1,000 people per day entered the territory. He stated that most of the new immigrants were from Western states and "of the right kind to stay." Nute also commented on the lack of saw and grist mills in the territory and blamed the New England Emigrant Aid Company for the deficiency.

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Hiram Hill to Dear Wife

Hill, Hiram, 1804-

Hiram Hill wrote from Lexi[ng]ton, Missouri to his wife in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts on his way to Lawrence, Kansas Territory. The low river had forced him and other steamboat passengers to come ashore 25 miles short of Lexington. Once there, he heard rumors of war, reporting that Missourians "all armed to the teeth" were entering the Territory. Hill was sick and wished to turn back, but fellow travelers Mr. Whitney and Judge Johnson planned to continue. Hill included a brief message for his adopted son, Arthur.

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