Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Places -- Indian reservations (Remove)
Places -- Cities and towns (Remove)
Home and Family (Remove)
Government and Politics (Remove)
Date (Remove)
Page 1 of 1, showing 5 records out of 5 total, starting on record 1, ending on 5

<< previous| | next >>

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Territorial Census, 1855, District 8

McClure, J. R.

This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, gender, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over twenty-one were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. A statistical summary of the census followed the enumeration pages. For District 8, the place of election was the house of Ingraham Baker, on the Santa Fe Road. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation, and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The description of the Eighth District follows: "Commencing at the mouth of Elm Creek, one of the branches of Osage River; thence up the same to the Santa Fe road; thence by a direct northerly line to the southwest corner of the Pottawatomie reservation; thence up the western line thereof to the Kansas River; thence up said river and the Smoky Hill Fork, beyond the most westerly settlements; thence due south to the line of the territory; thence by the same to the line of the Sixth District; thence due north to the head of the south branch of the Neosho River; thence down said river to the lines of the Seventh District; thence due north to the place of beginning."

previewthumb

Thomas Hopkins Webb to Thaddeus Hyatt

Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866

In this letter, written in Boston, Massachusetts by Thomas Webb, the author stated his concerns about the outcome of the situation in Kansas. He did applaud the efforts of free state settlers to ensure the existence of liberty; however, he felt that not enough New Englanders were serious about keeping slavery out of Kansas Territory.

previewthumb

Ke Kahn [Joseph Napolean Bourassa] to Ne Kahn [Thomas Nesbit Stinson]

Bourassa, Joseph Napolean, 1810-1878

Joseph N. Bourassa, a Pottawatomie Indian who signed this letter with his Indian name of Ke Kahn, wrote to Thomas N. Stinson, a Tecumseh resident and Indian trader who had been adopted by the Shawnee tribe and given the Indian name of Ne Kahn. Bourassa, an interpreter for the Pottawatomie Agency, described difficulties in finding laborers to cut the hay that he had promised to provide to Stinson.

previewthumb

Territorial Census, 1855, District 16

Leib, Charles

This census was taken in order to determine eligible voters for elections to be held as proclaimed by Governor Andrew Reeder on November 10, 1854. The categories for information in the census were name, occupation, age, gender, emigrated from, native of United States, naturalized citizen, declarant (intention to become a citizen), Negro, slave, and voter. Only white males over twenty-one were eligible to vote. The districts used for the census were the same as the election districts. A statistical summary of the census followed the enumeration pages. For District 16, the place of election was the house of Keller & Kyle, in Leavenworth City. The boundaries of each district were described in Governor Reeder's proclamation, and it is difficult to determine what counties were in each district. The description of the District 16 follows: "Commencing at the mouth of Salt Creek; thence up said creek to the Military road; thence along the middle of said road to the lower crossing of Stranger Creek; thence up said creek to the line of the late Kickapoo reservation; and thence along the said line to the Thirteenth District; and thence by the same along a line corresponding to the courses of Stranger Creek, and keeping three miles west thereof, the Kansas River; thence down the Kansas River to the Missouri River to the place of beginning."

previewthumb

Nebraska and Kanzas

J. H. Colton & Co.,

The map, published in 1855, showed the eastern portions of both Kansas and Nebraska. The Nebraska portion depicts the counties that had been established at that time. The Kansas portion included cities, various Indian reservations, and rivers.

previewthumb
<< previous| | next >>