Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Places -- Other States -- Indiana (Remove)
Places -- Other States (Remove)
Date (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
People (Remove)
Page 1 of 1, showing 10 records out of 10 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| | next >>

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Jonathan Crews to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Crews, Jonathan

Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

previewthumb

Dr. Martha Cunningham

This black and white photograph shows Dr. Martha Cunningham, one of the first female doctors to practice in Kansas. Martha was born on January 1, 1854, in Greencastle, Indiana. She moved to Kansas with her parents, in 1865, to a farm near Birch Swith, four miles southwest of Garnett, Kansas. She taught school for a few years before devoting her life to the medical profession. In 1886, Cunningham graduated from the Women's Division of the Chicago School of Medicine. She practiced for over twenty-five years in the Garnett community.

previewthumb

Settlers on Little Sugar Creek

Stewart, John E.

This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

previewthumb

Leigh R. Webber to Charles Brown

Webber, L. R.

A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Fort Scott, Kansas, addressed to Charles Brown. Webber expresses frustration at his bad health, the poor weather, and fort life. He wished for the troops to move to territory where they could engage in battle and gain "military glory." Webber describes the unruly behavior of the troops, including violence and drunkenness.

previewthumb

Richard Mendenhall to Augustus Wattles

Mendenhall, Richard

Richard Mendenhall was a missionary at the Shawnee Friends Mission in the 1840s. He returned to Indiana for a time but moved back to Kansas Territory in the fall of 1855. He was in Kansas during the territorial era and wrote Wattles describing an attact on the Friends Mission on August 20, 1856 by proslavery forces. He indicated that they were told to leave or the mission would be burned. However, Mendenhall wrote that David Atchison and other proslavery supporters asked that the Friends be left out of the violence. Mendenhall also described an attempt to form a settlement by men from Georgia about 3 miles from Osawatomie. He wrote that they were friendly at first but they later committed depredations. In response, about 100 free state men ran them off, took $500 in clothing and provisions, and burned a fort they had built. Mendenhall believed that the Battle of Osawatomie was a response to this.

previewthumb

1880 census of Rock Creek Township, Wabaunsee County, Kansas

United States. Census Office. 10th census, 1880

This excerpt of a census schedule provides details--including the name, age, race, and occupation--of settlers in Rock Creek Township in Wabaunsee County, Kansas. The county included a black population (B=Black) who had settled there in 1879 with the help of the Freedmen's Relief Association.

previewthumb

Settlers on the Marais des Cygnes River

Stewart, John E.

This document, presumably compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, lists the pro-slavery and free state settlers who resided on the Marais des Cygnes River in Kansas Territory. The author also included a listing of where the free-state settlers lived before coming to Kansas.

previewthumb

Prospectus of the "White Cloud Chief."

Miller, Sol (Solomon), 1831-1897

Born at Lafayette, Indiana, on January 22, 1831, and raised in Ohio, Sol Miller "indentured" in the Germantown Gazette office in Germantown, Ohio, and in 1854 purchased half interest in that newspaper. Three years later he removed to White Cloud, Doniphan County and published the first issue of the White Cloud Kansas Chief on June 4, 1857. This printed "Prospectus" is signed by at least twenty "subscribers" who proposed "to commence the publication of paper bearing the above title [White Cloud Chief], early in the Spring of 1857" and describes the nature of the size, scope, etc., of the proposed newspaper to be edited and published by Miller.

previewthumb

William Alfred Peffer

Leonard, J. H.

William Alfred Peffer was the first Populist senator elected to U.S. Congress. He was born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, on September 10, 1831. As a young man he traveled across the country, living in California, Indiana, Missouri, and Illinois. After the outbreak of Civil War, Peffer enlisted in the 83rd Illinois Infantry, entering as a private and working his way up to the rank of second lieutenant. He read law while still in the military, and after his discharge in 1865 he was admitted to the bar and began practicing law in Clarksville, Tennessee. Five years later he moved to Fredonia, Kansas, where he established another practice and edited the Fredonia Journal. Peffer served as a state senator from 1874 to 1876, and during his tenure he relocated to Coffeyville, Kansas, where he assumed editorial control of the Coffeyville Journal. Then, in 1881, he launched the Populist publication Kansas Farmer, one of his best-known contributions to this agrarian reform movement. Peffer was instrumental in the creation of the People?s (Populist) Party, serving as a Populist U.S. Senator from 1891 to 1897 and running again (unsuccessfully) for re-election in 1896. Two years later, he ran an unsuccessful campaign for Governor of Kansas, losing the election to Republican William Stanley. Peffer died in 1912 in Grenola, Kansas, at the age of 81.

previewthumb

Indianapolis Clowns

This black and white photograph shows members of the Indianapolis Clowns. The franchised was organized between 1935 and 1936 in Miami, Florida. The team moved in 1943 to Cincinnati, Ohio and later in 1946 to Indianapolis, Indiana. In the later years the team became a kind of the "Harlem Globetrotters" of baseball before disbanding in the late 1980s. Some of the players in this photograph have been identified. Back row: l to r; Hoss Walker, unknown, Johnny Williams, Fred Wilson, Roosevelt Davis, Alec Radcliff and McKinley "Bunny" Downs. Middle row: Sam Hairston, unknown, Buster Haywood, unknown, unknown. Front row: unknown, unknown, Richard "King Tut" King, unknown.

previewthumb
<< previous| | next >>

Places -- Other States -- Indiana

Places -- Other States

Date

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Type of Material

People

Agriculture

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Environment

Government and Politics

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

Places

Thematic Time Period