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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 11 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John Steuart Curry sketch

Curry, John Steuart

In the late 1930s, artist and Kansas native John Steuart Curry produced this preliminary sketch for the mural, "Tragic Prelude," housed at the Kansas Statehouse. The sketch references John Brown and the struggle against slavery during the Territorial Period. Curry completed the mural in 1942, but due to Kansans' critical reaction he refused to complete the project. In 1993, The Wunderlich Mongerson, a Chicago-based art gallery, collaborated with Curry's widow to donate this sketch.

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John Steuart Curry sketch

Curry, John Steuart

In the late 1930s artist and Kansas native John Steuart Curry produced this preliminary sketch of conquistadors for the mural Tragic Prelude housed at the Kansas statehouse. The sketch references the 1541 Spanish expedition through Kansas led by Francisco Coronado. Curry completed the mural in 1942, but due to Kansans' critical reaction he refused to complete the project. In 1993, The Wunderlich Mongerson, a Chicago-based art gallery, collaborated with Curry's widow to donate this sketch.

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William Howard Taft campaigning for President, Newton, Kansas

This sepia colored photograph shows William Howard Taft, the Republican candidate for the U.S. Presidency, speaking to the crowd at the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company depot in Newton, Kansas. Standing to the left of Taft is the U.S. Senator from Kansas Charles Curtis. Taft won the November election by defeating the Democratic candidate William Jennings Bryan to become the twenty-seventh President of the United States.

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President Gerald Ford, Topeka, Kansas

These four black and white photographs show the thirty-eighth President of the United States Gerald R. Ford speaking to an estimated crowd of 12,500 people on the east steps of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas. Prior to this address, he spoke to a joint session of the Kansas legislature about his economic and energy programs. Later in the day, the president met with ten Midwest governors at Cedar Crest for a working luncheon to discuss proposals for strengthening the nation's economy and reducing America's dependency on Middle-East oil.

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Kansas State Capitol building, Topeka, Kansas, 1867

Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882

This stereograph shows the Kansas State Capitol building under construction in Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas, in 1867. The photograph shows scaffolding, workers, building stone, and a portion of the completed first floor. The stereograph is from Alexander Gardner's series, "Across the Continent on the Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division," and includes the notation "351 miles west of St. Louis Mo."

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Ephriam Nute, Jr. to Reverend Edward Everett Hale

Nute, Ephraim

Ephraim Nute, a Unitarian minister writing from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Edward Everett Hale, described the natural environment, economic developments, politics, religious affairs, and daily life in the territory. Nute commented on the need for more saw mills, efforts to construct a church, prospects for "free-thinking Christianity," and the possibility of armed conflict in the territory.

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Ephraim Nute to Amos Adams Lawrence

Nute, Ephraim

Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts, regarding the subject of a college. A well-attended town meeting had been held in which the idea had been discussed, though all seemed only "a castle in the air" but for Lawrence's "liberal offer" (presumably of funding) which was the "first step toward the realization of his project." The general opinion of the people was that the college should be constructed outside the town limits "on the high prairie or table land." Nute also mentioned the steps being taken to establish free public schools in the city, of upper and lower grades.

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President Gerald Ford and Kansas Governor Robert Bennett

This color photograph shows the thirty-eighth President of the United States Gerald Ford and Kansas Governor Robert Bennett in front of Cedar Crest, the official residence of the governor in Topeka, Kansas. On February 11, 1975, President Ford arrived in Topeka to speak before the Kansas Legislator about his economic and energy programs. Later in the day, the president met with ten Midwest governors at Cedar Crest for a working luncheon to discuss proposals for strengthening the Nation's economy and reducing America's dependency on oil from the Middle East.

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Thomas Bickerton testimony

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This testimony, taken down by Thaddeus Hyatt as part of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, is divided into two parts. It begins with descriptions of his life before he came to Kansas Territory and his efforts to set up a claim outside of Lawrence, including his technique for building his sod house. Thomas Bickerton was a well traveled individual and an influential commander of a free state artillery company. He was involved in skirmishes with border ruffians and in the attack on Franklin. Also, General James Lane sent him to Kansas City to obtain a brass howitzer (later known as the Abbott howitzer) for use against the proslavery forces.

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William Beh, testimony

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This testimony, presumably from the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, was most likely recorded on paper by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. This particular testimony is a very brief account of William Beh's experiences during the turbulent times of 1856 and 1857. It includes information about his claim on the south fork of Pottawatomie Creek and his involvement in the militia as a member of Capt. Samuel Anderson's company. He also requests aid, because he has been sick for three or four months.

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