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Page 1 of 10, showing 10 records out of 97 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Anna Freud lecturing at the Menninger Clinic, Topeka, Kansas

Anna Freud lectures at the Menninger School of Psychiatry 20th reunion. Karl Menninger, MD, is joining her in laughter. Menninger is a leading psychiatric hospital dedicated to treating individuals with mood, personality, anxiety and addictive disorders, teaching mental health professionals and advancing mental healthcare through research. Once located in Topeka, Kansas, they relocated in 2003 to Houston, Texas.

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Frederic Remington

Frederic Remington took art classes as a freshman at Yale. He decided he was less interested in still life and more fascinated with action drawings. At the age of nineteen he decided to head west in search of frontier adventure and fortune. Remington lived in Kansas from 1883 to 1885. He first invested in a sheep ranch near Peabody. He continued his sketching, but soon found he disliked ranch life. Remington sold his interest in the ranch and returned east to acquire more money. He returned to Kansas City and bought a hardware store, also becoming a silent partner in a saloon. In 1884 he married Eva Caten. Unhappy with Remington's cartoons at the time and his involvement in the saloon, she returned to New York. Alone amid failing businesses, Remington was motivated to rely on his sketches for income. Virtually a self-taught artist, Remington was soon receiving national acclaim for his paintings and illustrations. In 1886 Remington's work was reproduced on a full page in Harper's Weekly. During the early 1890s Remington illustrated books and articles by such famous authors as Theodore Roosevelt and Francis Parkman. By 1895 Remington had begun sculpting the bronzes of cowboys and American Indians for which he is now legendary. He died at the age of 48 in 1909.

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Frederic Remington

A photograph of Frederic Remington working in his studio. He took art classes as a freshman at Yale, and he decided he was less interested in still life and more fascinated with action drawings. At the age of nineteen he decided to head west in search of frontier adventure and fortune. Remington lived in Kansas from 1883 to 1885. He first invested in a sheep ranch near Peabody. He continued his sketching, but soon found he disliked ranch life. Remington sold his interest in the ranch and returned east to acquire more money. He returned to Kansas City and bought a hardware store, also becoming a silent partner in a saloon. In 1884, he married Eva Caten. She became unhappy with Remington's cartoons and his involvement in the saloon so she left and returned to New York. Alone amid a failing business, Remington was motivated to rely on his sketches for income. Virtually a self-taught artist, Remington was soon receiving national acclaim for his paintings and illustrations. In 1886 Remington's work was reproduced on a full page in Harper's Weekly. During the early 1890s Remington illustrated books and articles by such famous authors as Theodore Roosevelt and Francis Parkman. By 1895 Remington had begun sculpting the bronzes of cowboys and American Indians for which he is now legendary. He died at the age of 48 in 1909.

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George Armstrong Custer

This copy of a carte de visite shows George Armstrong Custer, (1839-1876). Custer a United States army cavalry officer is remembered for commanding the U.S. Seventh Cavalry Regiment into the Battle of the Little Bighorn, on June 25, 1876, in which all of his soldiers and Custer himself were attacked and killed by a coalition of Plains Indians.

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Eli Thayer

Portrait of Eli Thayer, 1819-1899, who in 1853-54 was a representative in the Massachusetts legislature and while there, originated and organized the New England Emigrant Aid Company. He worked to combine the northern states in support of his plan to send antislavery settlers into Kansas. Lawrence, Topeka, Manhattan, and Ossawatomie, Kansas, were settled under the auspices of his company.

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William Howard Taft campaigning for President, Newton, Kansas

This sepia colored photograph shows William Howard Taft, the Republican candidate for the U.S. Presidency, speaking to the crowd at the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company depot in Newton, Kansas. Standing to the left of Taft is the U.S. Senator from Kansas Charles Curtis. Taft won the November election by defeating the Democratic candidate William Jennings Bryan to become the twenty-seventh President of the United States.

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Anna Freud correspondence

Freud, Anna, 1895-1982

These are handwritten and typed letters, mostly outgoing, from Anna Freud to Karl Menninger, Rudolph Ekstein, May D. Lee, and other Menninger Foundation staff. Anna Freud was the youngest child of psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud. Topics include publishing and requesting reprints, visits (or apologizing for not visiting), professional organizations and conferences, comments and critiques on writings, family deaths, and greeting cards. Anna Freud came to the Menninger Clinic in Topeka on multiple occasions during the 1960s. These papers are part of the historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives.

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Olaf Olsson

This black and white photograph shows Pastor Olaf Olsson, also spelled Olof Olsson. Olsson settled in Lindsborg, Kansas and was the religious leader of the Swedish Lutheran congregation.

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Robert T. Stephan with President Ronald Reagan

This is a photograph of Robert T. Stephan shaking hands with President Ronald Reagan. After graduating from Washburn University's law school, Robert T. Stephan practiced law in Wichita, Kansas. From 1965 to 1978, he was a district court judge in Wichita, Kansas. In 1979, he was elected Kansas Attorney General and he served in that office for 16 years. He helped craft and eventually win passage of the 1992 Victims' Rights Amendment. The legislation established a compensation fund, crime victims' board, community grants, and revised sentencing guidelines in Kansas. After leaving office, he moved to Lenexa, Kansas, and worked as a corporate legal consultant, dealing principally in consumer protection matters and federal trade commission rules in regard to marketing. Stephan has received many awards for his service to the state and community.

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Robert T. Stephan with President Bill Clinton

This is a photograph of Kansas Attorney General Robert T. Stephan shaking hands with United States President Bill Clinton. After graduating from Washburn University's law school, Robert T. Stephan practiced law in Wichita, Kansas. From 1965 to 1978, he was a district court judge in Wichita, Kansas. In 1979, he was elected Kansas Attorney General and he served in that office for 16 years. He helped craft and eventually win passage of the 1992 Victims' Rights Amendment. The legislation established a compensation fund, crime victims' board, community grants, and revised sentencing guidelines in Kansas. After leaving office, he moved to Lenexa, Kansas, and worked as a corporate legal consultant, dealing principally in consumer protection matters and federal trade commission rules in regard to marketing. Stephan has received many awards for his service to the state and community.

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