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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 15 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Mary Brown to William Brown

Brown, Mary Ann Day , 1816-1884

This letter, written by Mary Brown from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to her brother, William, who was studying at Phillip Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. Mary and William were the children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. The main focus of the letter is the story of how Dr. John Doy was captured by Missourians while aiding twelve fugitive slaves. Mary was convinced that someone had told the Missourians about the plan of escape. She also mentioned her father's religious work, and "Old" John Brown's work to free Missouri slaves.

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Settlers on Little Sugar Creek

Stewart, John E.

This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

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Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Nute, Ephraim

Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute inquired about the possibility of Hale arranging a loan of $2000 at reasonable interest for the completion of the Unitarian Church in Lawrence. He reported on the high rates of interest being charged for loans in Kansas Territory and on the general effects of the panic of 1857 on the territorial economy. Nute also expressed his dissatisfaction with the Buchanan administration's handling of the Lecompton Constitution and his hope that a change in presidential administration in 1860 would result in Kansas' admission as a free state.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

From Osawatomie, Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown regarding monies Adair had received for the "free State men in Kansas" and specifies how these funds were distributed.

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Ephraim Nute to Amos Adams Lawrence

Nute, Ephraim

Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts, regarding the subject of a college. A well-attended town meeting had been held in which the idea had been discussed, though all seemed only "a castle in the air" but for Lawrence's "liberal offer" (presumably of funding) which was the "first step toward the realization of his project." The general opinion of the people was that the college should be constructed outside the town limits "on the high prairie or table land." Nute also mentioned the steps being taken to establish free public schools in the city, of upper and lower grades.

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S. L. Adair to the friends of Christ

Adair, Samuel Lyle

This letter reported on the current religious situation in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. According to the author, a missionary with the American Missionary Association, the residents had begun the preliminary steps for organizing a church. In Osawatomie there were a number of Baptists, Congregationalists, and Wesleyans, along with a large group who "make no profession of religion." Adair also wrote about the sickness that prevented more formal organization.

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Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Nute, Ephraim

Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute included a list of books that he wished to add to his Unitarian church library. Nute commented on the difficulties experienced by those attempting to spread Christianity in Kansas. He also observed that immigration to Kansas was increasing.

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G. S. Lewis to Samuel L. Adair

Lewis, G. S.

G. S. Lewis,a friend of Samuel Adair, writes from Albany in Athens County, Ohio. Lewis was concerned about the safety of the Adair family, and commented on the trials they must be suffering. He comments on the bravery of Charley, the Adair's son who helped warn Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, of the coming of proslavery forces prior to the Battle of Osawatomie. Lewis also comments on John Brown, Gov. Geary, John Freemont, and the political situation in Kansas Territory and nationally. He shares rumors of slave insurrections in Kentucky and Tennessee.

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List of clothing articles

Bourne, S.

This is a detailed list of the articles of clothing sent to Kansas by the First Congregational Church in Flushing, New York. It includes dresses, frocks, coats, skirts, pants, drawers, shirts, socks, vests, boots and gloves as well as other items. The pastor of the church, S. Bourne, emphasized the quality and durability of the clothing.

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