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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Bird's Eye View of Concordia, Cloud County, Kansas

Stoner, J. J.

This lithograph is a bird's eye view of Concordia, Cloud County, Kansas. The legend at the bottom identifies the following: Concordia College, the high school, the Courthouse, several churches including a Swedish Baptist Church, hotels, a livery stable, a feed stable, the U. S. Land Office, two commercial land offices, two law offices, and the Concordia Mill. Street names are given. A railroad is shown but the company is not identified. The lithograph was published by J. J. Stoner of Madison, Wisconsin.

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Abraham Lincoln

An engraving of Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President of the United States. He successfully led the country through its greatest internal crisis, the Civil War, saving the Union and ending slavery, only to be assassinated as the war was virtually over. Before becoming the first Republican elected to the Presidency, Lincoln was a lawyer, an Illinois state legislator, and a member of the United States House of Representatives.

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Richard Josiah Hinton

A pencil drawing of Richard Josiah Hinton, 1830-1901. Hinton a New York journalist and an anti-slavery advocate moved to the Kansas territory in June of 1856 to battle against the expansion of slavery in the new territory. Shortly after his arrival in Lawrence, KS, Hinton soon advocated against slavery by writing to Eastern newspapers about the turbulent affairs in the Kansas territory. The numerous newspaper articles penned by Hinton reflected the individuals' views and opinions of a free-state without the institution of slavery. By the early part of 1862, Hinton was recruiting volunteers for the First Kansas Colored Infantry Regiment, and was appointed the rank of first lieutenant to the Regiment. He continued to move up in the military ranks with the promotion to captain of Company B, Second Kansas Colored on October 21, 1863. In November of 1856, Hinton mustered out of military service having reached the brevet rank of colonel. He finished the war serving as acting inspector general of the Freedman's Bureau as well as being sent to the South for secret service work ordered by President Abraham Lincoln. Following the war Hinton contributed articles to many different magazines and wrote several books, including John Brown and His Men: With Some Account of the Roads They Traveled to Reach Harpers Ferry (1894), an admiring biography of Hinton's old leader and hero. He, also, held several politically appointed positions within the federal government (i.e., United States commissioner of emigration in Europe in 1867; inspector of U.S. consulates in Europe; special agent to President Ulysses S. Grant to Vienna in 1873; special agent to the Departments of Treasury and State on the frontier and in Mexico in 1883; irrigation engineer to the U.S. Geological Survey from 1889-1890; and special agent in charge of the Department of Agriculture from 1890 to 1892.) While on business in London, England, Hinton died suddenly on December 20, 1901.

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Franklin Pierce

Engraving of Franklin Pierce, 1804-1869, who served as United States President from 1853 to 1857.

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John Palmer Usher

This black and white engraving shows John Palmer Usher, (1816-1889). A lawyer from Indiana and a member of President Abraham Lincoln's cabinet. Usher served only two years as the seventh U.S. Secretary of the Interior, (1863-1865), before returning to private life. In 1865, he become the chief counsel for the Kansas Pacific Railroad a position he held until his retirement in 1880. Usher also resumed his political career when he moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1872, and was elected to serve one term as the town's mayor (1879-1881). On April 13, 1889 at the age of seventy-three, he passed away at the University Hospital in Philadelphia after a lengthy illness. Burial was at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Wilson Shannon

Doney, Thomas

Portrait of Wilson Shannon, Territorial Governor of Kansas, commissioned August 10, 1855, took the oath September 7, 1855, served June 24, 1856, July 7 to August 18, 1856, and sworn in a second time June 13, 1856.

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John Speer

John Speer was a free state supporter and early resident of Lawrence, Kansas Territory. He was a journalist and editor and was involved in numerous free state activities.

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James Henry Lane

Dudensing, R.

Portrait of James Henry Lane, 1814-1866, United States senator from Kansas, 1861-1866.

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Robert John Walker

Portrait of Robert John Walker, 1801-1869, Kansas Territorial Governor. He took the oath of office May 9, 1857 and served from May 27 to November 16, 1857.

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Daniel Read Anthony

Dudensing, R.

This engraving shows Daniel Read, Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory in 1854 as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and later settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successfully career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business to enlist in the Union army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, Anthony's military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth, Kansas.

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