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Page 1 of 1, showing 10 records out of 10 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Johnston Lykins

Johnston Lykins was a well-known missionary, physician, and translator who worked with the Pottawatomi and Shawnee Indians who had moved to Indian Territory (present-day Kansas) after the passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830. In 1831, after serving as a missionary to the Indian tribes in Indiana and Michigan, Lykins and his first wife Delilah (McCoy) Lykins moved to Indian Territory. Lykins and his father-in-law, Isaac McCoy, established the Shawnee Indian Baptist Mission in present-day Johnson County, Kansas. In addition to his responsibilities as a physician, Lykins worked as a translator and developed a system of Indian orthography that allowed the Shawnee people to read and write in their native language. He edited and published the first paper printed in Shawnee, called the Sinwiowe Kesibwi (Shawnee Sun). In the spring of 1843, Lykins founded a mission among the Pottawatomi near what is today Topeka. Due, perhaps, to inter-denominational conflicts and other problems with the mission, Lykins left the Pottawatomi mission and moved to Kansas City, Missouri. He served as the second mayor of Kansas City in 1854, and he remained in residence there until his death in 1876.

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Stephen Harriman Long

Peale, Charles Willson, 1741-1827

This is a painting of Stephen Harriman Long, 1784-1864, by Charles Willson Peale. Long lead an expedition into the territory west of the Missouri River in 1819 and 1820. Under orders from John C. Calhoun, secretary of war, Long was to acquire thorough and accurate information on the soil, geography, water courses, animals, vegetation, and minerals in the new territory.

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Isaac McCoy

A portrait of missionary Reverend Isaac McCoy at age 47. Copied from a painting. Born the son of a Baptist preacher in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in 1784, McCoy spent his youth in Louisville, Kentucky. He married at age nineteen and moved to the Indiana Territory to preach in communities of settlers, French traders, and Indians. While there, McCoy witnessed what he considered the degradation and suffering of tribes at the hands of whites. He was one of the first to suggest the removal of Eastern tribes to the West. McCoy achieved mild success operating missions in Michigan and Indiana Territory, and training future Kansas missionaries, such as Jotham Meeker, Johnston Lykins, and Robert Simmerwell. He spent progressively more time in Washington D.C., lobbing for the establishment of reservations in the future states of Kansas and Oklahoma. McCoy found sympathy for his proposals, and in 1830 personally surveyed future Indian lands in what would become Kansas. The following year McCoy moved his family to Westport, Missouri, near present-day Kansas City.

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Rev. Lewis Bodwell

Smith, C.T. ; Topeka, KS

View of Rev. Lewis Bodwell, first pastor of the First Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas.

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Samuel Lyle Adair family

Cased sixth plate daguerreotype portrait of Samuel Adair, Charles Storrs Adair, Florella Brown Adair, and Emma Florilla Adair. The family settled near Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, where Adair was a minister and free state supporter. His wife was a half sister to John Brown and he occasionally stayed with the Adairs. The family was involved in various free state and relief activities.

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Maurice Gailland

Maurice Gailland, a Catholic Missionary among the Pottawatomie Indians, developed a dictionary and spelling system for the Pottawatomie to use in their masses.

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Abraham Still

Portrait of Dr. Abraham Still, physician, minister, and missionary at the Shawnee Methodist Indian Mission on the Wakarusa, 1851-1854. The mission was located in Section 8, T. 13, R. 21 E, a mile south of Eudora in northeastern Douglas County, Kansas.

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Benjamin Franklin Akers

Portrait of Benjamin Franklin Akers (1829-1880), from Yorkshire, England, who came to America with his parents in 1842 and lived them in Ohio. He married Rosetta Maria Hungerford on November 12, 1851. In the early 1860s, Akers opened a livery stable in Leavenworth, Kansas, where he supplied horses to the army and ran mule and oxen freight trains to Denver. At the close of the Civil War, he entered into a partnership with Colonel Amasa Sprague. They purchased a tract of land adjoining the city of Lawrence, Kansas, and established the Kansas Stock Farm. Sprague and Akers erected stables, built a training course, and purchased the famous trotting stallion, Ethan Allen. After Akers' death in 1880, his wife Rosetta lost the farm. The land was sold and developed, but their house remains at 1645 Louisiana Street in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Alexander W. Doniphan

This portrait engraving of Alexander W. Doniphan was copied from Doniphan's Expedition by John Taylor Hughes. Doniphan was a Colonel of the First regiment Missouri volunteers and a Liberty, Missouri, lawyer. Doniphan County, Kansas, and the town of Doniphan were named for Alexander W. Doniphan.

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Henry Worrall with his guitar

Grigs, A. D.

Guitarist and artist Henry Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 and died there in 1902. This photograph shows a youthful Worrall standing with his guitar. The photo was probably taken during Worrall's residence in Ohio in the 1850s or 1860s and reproduced later in Topeka by A. D. Griggs, as the border bears his imprint. Worrall's celebrated solo guitar instrumentals "Sebastopol" and "Violet Waltz" enjoyed great popularity in the nineteenth century. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular solo guitar pieces played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms.

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