Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Date -- 1854-1860 (Remove)
People (Remove)
Collections (Remove)
Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable -- Relief (Remove)
Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable (Remove)
Page 1 of 11, showing 10 records out of 110 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Alfred Larzelere

Alfred Larzelere of Doniphan County was active in free state politics. He served as speaker of the Kansas House in 1859 and as a delegate to the Leavenworth constitutional convention. He was also a member of the Free State Central committee.

previewthumb

National Kansas Relief Committee, minutes

National Kansas Committee

This document details the minutes of three meetings of the Kansas Relief Committee, otherwise known as the National Kansas Committee, held in 1856 on June 9th, June 21st, and June 26th. It also includes information about the membership of this emigrant aid company. The first of these meetings adopted resolutions to aid the plight of free-state settlers in Kansas Territory. Furthermore, the members of the committee decided to establish five thousand settlers in Kansas Territory and to give them a year's worth of provisions.

previewthumb

Minutes, meetings "on the behalf of sufferers in Kansas"

Denison, Joseph, 1815-1900

Joseph Denison recorded minutes of preliminary meetings that organized efforts to raise money and donations on behalf of the citizens of Kansas Territory, who had suffered as a result of severe drought. Included is an announcement entitled "The Kansas Famine," that predicted at least 30,000 in the Territory would "inevitably perish during the coming winter" were help not secured.

previewthumb

Edmund Burke Whitman? to Franklin B. Sanborn

Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883

E. B. Whitman (letter not signed, but author's identity is pretty clear), an agent in Lawrence for the National Kansas Committee, wrote Franklin Sanborn in Massachusetts regarding his disappointment with the lack of support being given by "our professed friends" in the East. To their discredit, according to Whitman, Massachusetts "supporters" had refused to provide assistance which was desperately needed for the Kansas settlers who had just endured a very "severe winter." He believed false information was being circulated for political purposes by individuals within the Free State movement: "Kansas, bleeding Kansas, is of value to them only so far as it subserves their selfish ends."

previewthumb

An invitation to an address written by Ralph Waldo Emerson

Channing, William F.

A printed invitation issued by William F. Channing in repsonse to an address delivered by Ralph Waldo Emerson on the topic of aid to the sufferers in Kansas. This address was given at the Tremont Temple in Boston, Massachusetts, and sponsored by the Young Men's Kansas Relief Society.

previewthumb

Kansas Territory citizens to the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America

This unsigned statement was written to protest "the practice of taxing the people of the Territories for the support of a Government in which they are not represented." The residents of Kansas Territory complained that they had had no voice in how these tax dollars were appropriated, and they asked this "honorable body" to remit to them these taxes. Since this was during the drought of 1860, they declared that they would use these funds for famine relief.

previewthumb

Orville Chester Brown to unknown

This letter, presumably written by Orville Chester Brown, is an excellent example of a free state perspective on the events of 1856 in Kansas Territory. Speaking in rather eloquent terms, the author expresses anger at the United States government for their refusal to aid free state settlers.

previewthumb

C. W. Holder to James Blood

Holder, C. W.

As were several other individuals from Illinois, Holder writes to notify Blood that the people in his community (around Bloomington, Illinois) are eager to share their "abundance" with "their brethren in Kansas." They are preparing to send potatoes, as well as wheat and oats, but need help purchasing sacks and paying freight; "our people as you are probably aware are just recovering from the financial pressure of the past 3 years" and thus had "little money."

previewthumb

H. B. Hurd to Thomas W. Higginson

Hurd, H. B.

H. B. Hurd was secretary of the National Kansas Committee in Chicago, Illinois. He writes this letter to Reverend Thomas W. Higginson in Worcester, Massachusetts, from the committee's office in Chicago. The main focus of the letter revolves around Higginson's plan of operation to garner support from free state governors. Hurd offers advice about which governors to approach first, also stating his opinion on various related matters. Included in the letter is another sheet, outlining Higginson's "Points to be suggested to the Executives of the States." The back of this sheet has some other notes and doodling.

previewthumb

Samuel Cabot, Jr. to James Blood

Cabot, Samuel

Samuel Cabot, who was directing a Boston effort to send clothing to Kansas Territory, advises Blood he was aware of the goods that "had been stopped at St Louis by the closure of navigation." He also comments on the reluctance of some to accept relief; these individuals are to be advised that "This supply is not a mere charity but a contribution of the North to soldiers, who have been bravely battling for the case of freedom & in defense of our common rights, against the Slave Oligarchy." Cabot encloses a printed letter titled "Clothing For Kanzas," listing New England contributions.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Date -- 1854-1860

People

Collections

Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable -- Relief

Agriculture

Business and Industry

Community Life

Curriculum

Date

Environment

Government and Politics

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation

Type of Material