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Date -- 1854-1860 (Remove)
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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 38 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Jonathan Crews to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Crews, Jonathan

Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

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James Barnes Whitaker correspondence

This collection includes materials related to all aspects of James Barnes Whitaker's professional life, including his real estate business and his legal career, particularly for the pensioners he helped. He came to Tecumseh, Shawnee County in 1856 and worked there as a surveyor. In 1857, he moved to Topeka where he remained, serving as county sheriff, surveyor, and Topeka city engineer. He owned an abstract and real estate business in Topeka and was an attorney, representing numerous Civil War veterans in obtaining disability pensions, many of whom served in Kansas units. The collection consists of Whitaker's correspondence (arranged chronologically) and Whitaker's 1857 certificate of appointment as a U.S. Deputy Marshal.

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Wilson Shannon to John A. Halderman

Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877

Wilson Shannon was an Ohio Democrat who preceded John W. Geary as governor of Kansas Territory (August 1856--August 1857) and was considered a proslave partisan. Shanon writes John Halderman from Lecompton, Kansas Territory, regarding some legal matters--specifically, "some land warrants" being sent to Halderman in Leavenworth. Attorney John Halderman was trusted and respected by men on both the anti- and pro-slavery sides.

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Knox & Kellogg to James B. Abbott

Attorneys Knox & Kellogg wrote from St. Louis to James Abbott in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, responding to a lawsuit brought against them by Samuel Cabot. Cabot held them responsible for the long delay in returning several rifles that had been stolen from him the previous spring by Missouri "Highwaymen." Knox and Kellogg reported to Abbott, acting as agent for Cabot, that the lawsuit had been dismissed and the damage to the rifles was to be appraised by a third party.

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Albert Howell Horton

In 1874 Albert Howell Horton was elected to a term in the Kansas House of Representatives and in 1876 was elected to a term in the Kansas Senate. In 1876 he was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

On the first leg of his move to Sumner, Kansas Territory, John J. Ingalls, a 24-year-old Massachusetts lawyer, wrote this brief letter from Boston, Mass., to his father, Elias T. Ingalls. Here Ingalls wrote regarding the fare and "the best method of getting West."

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Much of this interesting letter, dated November 21, 1858, from Sumner, Kansas Territory, describes the Ingalls law practice and the nature of a "frontier" court proceedings that often attracted "nearly all the population." According to Ingalls, "the chief difficulty arising [in the courts came] from the conflict of the two Codes, adopted by two hostile legislatures, each of which had adherents who call the other 'bogus.'" Ingalls also discussed the business of land sales, as something many others successfully combined with the practice of law.

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A. J. Beach to Samuel N. Wood

Beach, A. J.

As in his earlier letter to Samuel Wood of April 22, A. J. Beach, of Beach Valley, Kansas Territory, describes his Cow Creek bridge dispute with William Edwards and O. G. Stanley. In this letter, Beach officially retains the services of Wood & Perkins to sue Edwards and Stanley for damages. "I can prove," wrote Beach, "that they have asked trains to cross their bridge, taken toll on it, and repaired it with the avowed intention of making it a free bridge and taking the travel away from mine." Beach claims to be losing $20 a day in tolls.

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Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Thomas Ewing, Sr.

Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896

Thomas Ewing, Jr., wrote from Leavenworth to his father in Ohio seeking his assistance with a legal matter involving claims to the land "reserved to certain half breeds of the Kansas tribe." Most of this land was occupied by squatters and questions of legal title and transfer were being litigated in the territorial and federal courts.

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John Brown to Thomas Russell

Brown, John, 1800-1859

From his jail cell in Charles Town, Virginia, just days before he was to go on trial for treason, John Brown wrote seeking legal counsel for himself and fellow prisoners. Brown mentioned his wounds, but said they were "doing well," expresses special concern for "the young men prisoners," and closed "Do not send an ultra Abolitionist."

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