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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 18 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Daniel Read Anthony correspondence

Anthony, D. R. (Daniel Read), 1824-1904

Daniel Read Anthony letters covering 1858, 1861 and 1862. Daniel was an abolitionist and free stater, and served two terms as mayor of Leavenworth, Kansas. These letters focus on the struggles between the Border Ruffians and the Free State men, military matters, politics, and speaks of freed slaves he has met who want to incite insurrection among other blacks.

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Mary Savage correspondence

Savage, Mary

These two letters from Mary Savage detail her experience with Quantrill's raid on Lawrence, Kansas. Mary describes seeing homes and businesses burning and women trying to put the fires out, hiding in nearby fields so not to be seen by Quantrill's men, to taking care of the wounded and dead after the raiders left.

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Joseph H. Trego correspondence

Trego, Joseph H. (Joseph Harrington), 1823-1905

Joseph Harrington Trego was a physician and pioneer from Mound City. He came to Kansas in 1857 and became a "jayhawker." In this correspondence he talks of border warfare, formation of military units, politics, elections, crops, weather, military service in the Third Kansas Brigade Company D, 5th Kansas Cavalry, and life in Linn County, Kansas.

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Medical history of the 19th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry Volunteers

Bailey, Mahlon

Mahlon Bailey, the regimental surgeon, recorded this medical history of the 19th Kansas Cavalry. This history includes information on the hasty physicals given to new recruits, wounds received in battle, and other medical problems encountered on the trail, as well as general information about the day-to-day activities of the soldiers. Located at the end of the report is a chart detailing the medical problems of the regiment, including the number of cases of dysentery, gonorrhea, pneumonia, ulcers, burns, and sprains (among many others). At the end of these charts, Bailey expresses his appreciation to the commanders of the regiment, thanking them for following his medical advice and showing concern for the health of their soldiers.

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Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908

Mary Holliday wrote from Topeka to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, in Washington, D. C. She described farm and financial difficulties, especially her frustration with John, an incompetent hired hand. She also considered releasing her "girl" to save money and taking in Sister Tite as an unpaid but potentially helpful guest. Mary requested instructions concerning lumber, asked for seeds and carpets, and mentioned local happenings. She hoped that the statehood of Kansas would encourage Cyrus to return quickly. The letter has no signature.

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William Brown to Sarah Brown

Brown, William

This letter, written by William Brown from Topeka, Kansas, was addressed to his sister, Sarah Brown, in Lawrence. William and Sarah were children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. William discussed a Baptist church service in Topeka and the recent Kansas State Fair. The latter part of the letter discusses political issues, including recent elections and fear that the "bushwackers" may attack Leavenworth or Fort Scott.

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William Addison Phillips

Portrait of William Addison Phillips, an author, lawyer, journalist and politician. In 1857, Phillips attended the Constitution Convention at Topeka and the Free State Conventions at Centropolis, Lawrence, and Grasshopper Falls. He founded the town of Salina in April, 1858. In that same month and year, Phillips was nominated at the Topeka Free-State Convention under the Leavenworth Constitution to serve as a supreme court judge. He attended the Convention at Osawatomie and the Republican State Convention at Lawrence in 1859. Phillips served in the Kansas Volunteer Regiments and rose to the rank of colonel. From March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875 Phillips was an at large representative to the United States Congress and from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1879 he represented the First District.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

In Lawrence on January 19, 1861, attending the meeting of what proved to be the last territorial legislature, Ingalls wrote about everyone's interest in happenings outside the territory: namely, congressional action on the "Kansas Admission Bill" and the "Pacific Rail Road Bill," as well as "the condition of affairs of the South ['the secession movement']. Especially bad weather--"the snow is quite deep and the temperature below zero constantly"--had left Kansas somewhat isolated, and as they waited for news the legislature was "not doing much except discussing Union resolutions, endorsing Major [Robert] Anderson [commander of U.S. troops at Fort Sumter], and divorcing Every body that applies for rupture of the bonds of matrimony."

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Kansas Relief Committee, newspaper article

Smith, I. N.

This article, published in the Haverhill, Massachusetts Tri-Weekly Publisher, lists the contributions collected by their local Kansas Relief Committee. A number of different churches in the area donated cash, and the committee also sent varied articles of clothing (listed in the article) to General S.C. Pomeroy of Atchison.

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Governor George Monroe Beebe, annual message

Beebe, George Monroe 1836-1927

George Beebe assumed the title of Acting Governor of Kansas Territory upon the resignation of Samuel Medary. In this printed message from the Executive Office, Kansas Territory (Lecompton) to the territorial legislature, Beebe commented on Medary and other issues relating to Kansas Territory. He included information from the auditor about the amount of taxes that had been collected. He also referenced the pending dissolution of the Union and the "gloom" that brought to all.

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