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Date -- 1861-1869 (Remove)
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Type of Material -- Photographs (Remove)
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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 28 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Martin Anderson

This black and white photograph shows a painting of Major Martin Anderson, (1817-1897), from Circleville, Kansas. A commander of Union forces during the Civil War Anderson joined the military ranks on ,August 30, 1862, when he mustered into Company B of the 11th Kansas Volunteer Infantry Regiment as company captain. He rose through the military ranks to major on November 22, 1863 after the regiment was reassigned, in the summer of 1863, as the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry Regiment. Anderson served in this capacity until he mustered out, on September 18, 1865, at Fort Leavenworth. After the war he ran for political office, in 1866, and was elected the state treasurer of Kansas, (1867-1869). Anderson remained actively involved in community affairs until his passing, on July 9, 1897, at the age of eighty.

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John Palmer Usher

This black and white photograph shows John Palmer Usher (1816-1889). A lawyer from Indiana and a member of President Abraham Lincoln's cabinet. Usher served only two years as the seventh U.S. Secretary of the Interior, (1863-1865), before returning to private life. In 1865, he become the chief counsel for the Kansas Pacific Railroad a position he held until his retirement in 1880. Usher also resumed his political career when he moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1872, and was elected to serve one term as the town's mayor (1879 to 1881). On April 13, 1889, at the age of 73, Usher died at the University Hospital in Philadelphia after a lengthy illness. Burial was at Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Martin Anderson

Brown's Photographic Gallery

This carte de visite shows Major Martin Anderson, (1817-1897), of Circleville, Kansas. A commander of Union forces during the Civil War Anderson joined the military ranks, on August 30, 1862, when he mustered into Company B of the 11th Kansas Volunteer Infantry Regiment as company captain. He rose through the military ranks to major, on November 22, 1863, after the regiment was reassigned as the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry Regiment in the summer of 1863. Anderson served in this capacity until he mustered out, on September 18, 1865, at Fort Leavenworth. After the war he ran for political office, in 1866, and was elected the state treasurer of Kansas, (1867-1869). Anderson remained actively involved in community affairs until his passing, on July 9, 1897, at the age of eighty.

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Albert Howell Horton

In 1874 Albert Howell Horton was elected to a term in the Kansas House of Representatives and in 1876 was elected to a term in the Kansas Senate. In 1876 he was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court.

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Sidney Clarke

Alden & Shellabarger

This cabinet card shows Sidney Clarke, (1831-1909), an abolitionist from Lawrence, Kansas, and supporter of the Free Soil Movement. Clarke began his career as a public servant when he enlisted in 1859 as a volunteer with the Frontier Guard. Recognized for his effective leadership skills, Clarke was appointed in 1862 as Assistant Adjutant General of Volunteers. The following year he became the Assistant Provost Marshal General for Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, and Dakota. Clarke returned to Kansas shortly before the close of the Civil War and was elected in 1864 to the U.S. House of Representatives as a Republican. He was re-elected in 1866 and 1868, but was defeated in 1870 due to various scandals he was associated with. In 1878, Clarke resumed his political career when he was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives as an independent. Clarke's career in Kansas politics came to an end in 1880 when he was unable to win a seat in the Kansas Senate. His life as a politician was once again revived, when Clarke moved to Oklahoma in the 1880s and became an advocate for settlement and statehood in the territory. Clarke's tireless efforts became a reality, when Oklahoma became the forty-sixth state on November 16, 1907. Sidney Clarke passed away on June 18, 1909 in Oklahoma City at the age of seventy-eight.

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Edward Russell

This is a portrait of Edward Russell, a newspaperman and politician. He came to Kansas Territory in 1856, and located in Elwood, in Doniphan County, Kansas. Shortly after moving to Kansas, Russell started a newspaper that espoused the free-state side. In August, 1858, he lobbied Doniphan county citizens against the Lecompton Constitution. In that same year, Russell, D. W. Wilder and others founded a free-state paper. Russell later served in the Kansas legislature, and held several state offices.

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James Henry Lane

This is a copy of an original photograph taken of Lane in New York City, 1861. James Henry Lane was a Free State leader, serving as an aid to emigrants and the first United States Senator from Kansas. Mrs. John Ingalls had an original of this photograph, and she loaned it to William E. Connelley who had six copies made. Connelley presented one copy to the Kansas State Historical Society in 1912.

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William Addison Phillips

Portrait of William Addison Phillips, an author, lawyer, journalist and politician. In 1857, Phillips attended the Constitution Convention at Topeka and the Free State Conventions at Centropolis, Lawrence, and Grasshopper Falls. He founded the town of Salina in April, 1858. In that same month and year, Phillips was nominated at the Topeka Free-State Convention under the Leavenworth Constitution to serve as a supreme court judge. He attended the Convention at Osawatomie and the Republican State Convention at Lawrence in 1859. Phillips served in the Kansas Volunteer Regiments and rose to the rank of colonel. From March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875 Phillips was an at large representative to the United States Congress and from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1879 he represented the First District.

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Albert Howell Horton & wife

In 1874, Albert Horton was elected to a term in the Kansas House of Representatives and in 1876 was elected to a term in the Kansas Senate. In 1876 he was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court.

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James Blood

A black and white photograph of James Blood (1819-1891), native of Bolton, Vermont and member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company who moved to Lawrence, Kansas in July 1854. A supporter of the Free State Movement, Blood was actively involved in Kansas politics. From 1856 to 1857, Blood served as treasurer of the Kansas State Central Committee and became a member of the Topeka Legislature in 1856. In 1857, Blood was elected the first mayor of Lawrence, Kansas. Blood served as a delegate to the July 1859 Wyandotte Convention from Douglas County's Twelfth District. Blood continued to serve in Kansas politics and in the early 1860s, he was elected as county treasurer of Douglas County. In 1869, he was elected as a Republican to the Kansas House of Representatives from the Thirty-Fifth District of Lawrence. James Blood passed away on February 4, 1891 at the age of seventy-two.

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