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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 15 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Clergyman's pocket diary and visiting book belonging to Boston Corbett

Pocket diary belonging to Thomas P. "Boston" Corbett, the man who killed John Wilkes Booth following President Lincoln's assassination. Before moving to Cloud County, Kansas in 1878, Corbett was pastor of the Siloam (Methodist) Mission Church located at 328 Pine Street in Camden, New Jersey. The book contains a list of members, records of funerals and baptisms, and diary entries.

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Historic Psychiatry original miscellaneous documents

These are a variety of handwritten and typed letters, lectures, autographs, news clippings, biographical information, images and sketches, court documents, and other documents related to the history of psychiatry. These documents are housed in four boxes and the folders within are arranged alphabetically by surname or title, and they are included in the larger collection of historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives. Authors come from such fields as medicine, religion, prison and other reform and advocacy movements, politics, the military, etc. The documents themselves sometimes provide significant information, and sometimes they were collected because their authors were significant historical figures. Some of the individuals found in Box 1 include James Mark Baldwin, Ludwig Binswanger, Eugen Bleuler, Jean-Martin Charcot, Elizabeth Fry, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Carl Jung. Some of the individuals found in Box 2 include Alfred Adler, Robert Frost, and Washinton Irving. This box also includes a 68-page handwritten notebook by Dr. W.W. Reed entitled "Reminiscenses About the Treatment of the Insane." Some of the individuals found in Box 3 include Amariah Brigham and Frederick van Eeden. This box also includes a correspondence file (1883-1888) on Ellen Kehoe, a patient at the Worcester Lunatic Hospital in Massachusetts, and a series of drawings from the 1920s and 1930s by a Belgian patient suffering from paranoia named Andreas at the Kankakee State Hospital in Illinois. The drawings were donated by Dr. J.B. Gier, formerly of the Topeka Veteran's Administration Hospital, who knew the patient and encouraged his work. Box 4 includes a miscellaneous folder regarding insane asylums and contains legal documents, postcard images, and receipts for services. Languages include English, German, French and Italian, and transcriptions or translations follow some of the documents.

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Frederick Douglass

Portrait of Frederick Douglass, 1818-1895, who was an African-American leader in the abolitionist movement, a speaker, and an author.

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Henry Kuhn collection letterpress books

Kuhn, Henry, 1830-1900

Copies of correspondence both received and sent by Captain Henry Kuhn dating from after the Civil War until shortly before his death in 1898. Some of the letters are illegible. Much of the correspondence regards Kuhn's banking and other financial interests, particularly in Leavenworth, as well as other business and personal affairs, including during his time as an Indian agent in the Oklahoma area. Kuhn was county surveyor and township clerk in Atchison County, Indian agent in the Indian territory, publisher of a Marion County newspaper, and was otherwise a prominent Kansas citizen of the nineteenth century.

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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Henry and Clara Smith to John P. St. John

Smith, Henry and Clara

Henry Smith and his daughter, Clara, wrote this letter to Kansas Governor John St. John requesting information about black emigration to Kansas. Smith wrote on behalf of his community in Marshall, Texas, saying that a number of people were hoping to emigrate because they were unable to make a living due to discriminatory practices. According to the letter, some of the Smith's white neighbors were threatening to follow black emigrants if they attempted to leave the area (to what end is unclear). In addition to his role as Kansas governor, St. John served on the Board of Directors of the Kansas Freedmen's Relief Association.

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S. H. B. Schoonmaker to Governor John P. St. John

Shoonmaker, S. H. B.

S. H. B. Shoonmaker of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, wrote this letter to Governor St. John on behalf of the black residents of his parish (county). He asked the governor a number of specific questions, including how these black emigrants could obtain land, where they should settle, and whether there were relief organizations that could assist the refugees. In addition to his service as governor, St. John also served on the Board of Directors of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

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Elam Bartholomew diary

Bartholomew, Elam

Elam Bartholomew was a resident of Rooks County and Hays, Kansas. He was a horticulturalist, internationally known for his work with fungi. His diary reflects his active participation in Republican Party politics, local government, the United Presbyterian Church, farm organizations, and experimental farming. Elam Bartholomew was born in Pennsylvania, and his family moved first to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873, he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery. Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874, and returned to Illinois to marry Montgomery in June, 1876. The Bartholomews returned to Kansas in September, 1876, and lived on their farm on Bow Creek in Rooks County until 1929. They then moved south to Hays, Kansas, in Ellis County, where he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College until his death in 1934.

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George Armstrong Custer

Illingworth, W. H.

This copy from a stereograph shows George Armstrong Custer during the Black Hills Expedition. The image identified by Elizabeth B. Custer, shows her husband gathered around the carcass of a grizzly bear with Indian scout Bloody Knife, Captain William Ludlow; the chief engineer of the expedition and Private Noonan in the background. The military expedition to the Black Hills of South Dakota was a strategic plan by the United States government to explore the benefits of the uncharted land.

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Roseline Cunningham to John P. St. John

Cunningham, Roseline

Roseline Cunningham, a black schoolteacher from Westpoint, Mississippi, wrote this letter to Kansas governor John St. John concerning emigration to Kansas. Cunningham, like many other Exodusters, was unable to make a living in the South and sought information about settling in Kansas. She also wanted to know if there was a governmental agency or society that would help her (and her neighbors) cover the cost of emigration. Governor St. John served on the board of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

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