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Date -- 1870s (Remove)
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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence

Kansas. Adjutant General's Office

This correspondence was sent and received by the Kansas Adjutant General's Office. Hiram T. Benam served as Adjutant General from 1876-1878 and Peter S. Noble served from 1878-1883. It includes inquiries made from men "anxious for organization" hoping to enlist militias in the towns of Parsons, Independence, Iuka, Lawrence, and Hutchinson. The collection also includes bill of ladings from the Kansas Pacific Railway and Rock Island (Illinois) Arsenal. Frequent correspondence was exchanged with Willis Brown, cashier for the State Bank of Kansas in Seneca, Kansas, Scott Hopkins of the Kansas University Cadets, John T. Bradley, a lawyer from Council Grove and member of the Kansas Senate from 1876 to 1880, F.C. Merrill, a lumber dealer from Paola, and E.D. Rose, a hardware dealer from Holton.

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David J. Brewer and C. B. Brace to William Kincaid

Brewer, David J. (David Josiah), 1837-1910

A letter written by David J. Brewer and C. B. Brace, Leavenworth, Kansas, to Reverend William Kincaid, minister of the Congregational Church in Rushville, New York, encouraging him to become the minister of the First Congregational Church in Leavenworth, Kansas. The letter describes the church and invites Rev. Kincaid to spend time with the congregation. He accepted the position and served from the fall of 1870 through January, 1876. Brewer was a lawyer. During his distinguished legal career, he was a Kansas Supreme Court Justice,1871 - 1884, United States Circuit Court Justice, 1884 - 1889, and United States Supreme Court Justice, 1889 - 1910.

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Williard Davis

Mullen

This cabinet card shows Willard Davis, who served as Kansas' 10th Attorney General from January 8, 1877 to January 10, 1881. He was born January 26, 1837 in Madison County, Kentucky. He attended Missouri University, then studied law at Lexington, Kentucky, and was admitted to practice there. When the war began, he was commissioned into the Union army as a Lieutenant in the Thirty-First Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, but his military career was brief due to failing health. On March 14, 1863, Davis was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as the Internal Revenue Collector for Kentucky. He held the position until September 1, 1866 when he was dismissed for failure to accept President Andrew Johnson's policies. Davis resumed his law career and advocated for civil rights for freed slaves. In the fall of 1870, Davis moved to Neosho Falls, Kansas and became the attorney for the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. The following year he settled in Parsons, Kansas and was elected the town's first mayor. To focus on his political career, he resigned from the railroad in 1873. In 1874, he was elected county attorney for Labette County, Kansas. He held this office until he was elected in 1876 to serve as Attorney General for the State of Kansas. After two terms he returned to his private law practice. On December 6, 1885 at the age of forty-eight, he passed away after a lengthy illness at his home at Eleventh and Van Buren Street in Topeka, Kansas.

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Albert Howell Horton

In 1874 Albert Howell Horton was elected to a term in the Kansas House of Representatives and in 1876 was elected to a term in the Kansas Senate. In 1876 he was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court.

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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Albert Howell Horton & wife

In 1874, Albert Horton was elected to a term in the Kansas House of Representatives and in 1876 was elected to a term in the Kansas Senate. In 1876 he was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court.

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John Lewis Waller

Martin, H. T.

This sepia colored cabinet card shows John Lewis Waller, 1850-1907. Born into slavery, Waller overcame his humble beginnings to become an accomplished lawyer, journalist, politician and diplomat. He migrated to Kansas in the spring of 1878, after hearing of Pap Singleton's efforts to colonize Blacks in the state.

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William Eugene Stanley

This black and white photograph shows William Eugene Stanley, (1844-1910). Stanley, a native of Ohio, settled in Jefferson County, Kansas in 1870 to practice law. He entered public service, in 1871, by serving as the Jefferson County attorney, (1871-1872). A few years later he became the Sedgwick County attorney, (1874 to 1880). In 1880, he made a political bid for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives and served one term as a Republican from the ninety-second district, (1881-1883). Stanley resumed his political career in 1898, when he was elected the fifteenth governor of Kansas. He was also re-elected in 1901 to a second term. Stanley left office on January 12, 1903 to return to private life in Wichita, Kansas and to practice law. On October 13, 1919, William Eugene Stanley died at the age of 66. He was buried at the Highland Cemetery in Wichita, Kansas.

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Ira J. Lacock

Hickox, R.A., Hiawatha, Kansas

This cabinet card shows Ira J. Lacock (1831-1900), a lawyer from Hiawatha, Kansas. Lacock was a native of Washington County, Pennsylvania and graduated from Washington and Jefferson College in 1856 and later admitted to the bar in 1858. He moved in 1860 to Hiawatha, Kansas where he built a thriving law practice. During the Civil War, he organized and became captain of the Hiawatha Guards. This local militia attempted to join the First Kansas Infantry but later disbanded when their services were not needed. In 1862, he ran on the Republican ticket and was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives from the eleventh district. He was re-elected in 1863 and in 1865. At the start of Lancock's third term, his constituents asked that he resign for his failure to support a bill that allowed the railroad companies to obtain land that was originally entitled to the school district. On February 12, 1866, Lacock resigned his seat in the legislature and returned to Hiawatha. On August 16, 1866, he purchased the Union Sentinel newspaper. For a year he published and edited the paper before selling it on November 7, 1867. He was elected county attorney of Brown County in 1872, 1878, and 1888. For a number of years he also served as a Mason and master of Hiawatha Lodge, No. 35. On June 18, 1900 while addressing a meeting at the court house, Ira J. Lacock dropped to the floor dead at the age of sixty-nine.

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William Eugene Stanley

This black and white photograph shows William Eugene Stanley, (1844-1910). Stanley, a native of Ohio, settled in Jefferson County, Kansas, in 1870 to practice law. He entered public service, in 1871, by serving as the Jefferson County attorney, (1871-1872). A few years later he became the Sedgwick County attorney, (1874-1880). In 1880, he made a political bid for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives and served one term as a Republican from the ninety-second district, (1881-1883). Stanley resumed his political career in 1898, when he was elected the fifteenth governor of Kansas. He was also re-elected in 1901 to a second term. During his administration, the Kansas supreme court was increased to seven justices and funds were appropriated to finish the construction on the statehouse. Stanley left office on January 12, 1903 to return to private life in Wichita, Kansas, and to practice law. On October 13, 1910, William Eugene Stanley passed away at the age of sixty-six. He was later buried at the Highland Cemetery in Wichita, Kansas.

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