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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 27 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Henry Worrall watercolor

Worrall, Henry

This promotional watercolor of Kansas scenes was painted by artist Henry Worrall for the Woman?s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). It is believed that Worrall painted the poster for the Kansas chapter of the WCTU to use at the World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition held in New Orleans in 1884. The poster depicts Topeka and various types of Kansas iconography.

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Historic Psychiatry original miscellaneous documents

These are a variety of handwritten and typed letters, lectures, autographs, news clippings, biographical information, images and sketches, court documents, and other documents related to the history of psychiatry. These documents are housed in four boxes and the folders within are arranged alphabetically by surname or title, and they are included in the larger collection of historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives. Authors come from such fields as medicine, religion, prison and other reform and advocacy movements, politics, the military, etc. The documents themselves sometimes provide significant information, and sometimes they were collected because their authors were significant historical figures. Some of the individuals found in Box 1 include James Mark Baldwin, Ludwig Binswanger, Eugen Bleuler, Jean-Martin Charcot, Elizabeth Fry, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Carl Jung. Some of the individuals found in Box 2 include Alfred Adler, Robert Frost, and Washinton Irving. This box also includes a 68-page handwritten notebook by Dr. W.W. Reed entitled "Reminiscenses About the Treatment of the Insane." Some of the individuals found in Box 3 include Amariah Brigham and Frederick van Eeden. This box also includes a correspondence file (1883-1888) on Ellen Kehoe, a patient at the Worcester Lunatic Hospital in Massachusetts, and a series of drawings from the 1920s and 1930s by a Belgian patient suffering from paranoia named Andreas at the Kankakee State Hospital in Illinois. The drawings were donated by Dr. J.B. Gier, formerly of the Topeka Veteran's Administration Hospital, who knew the patient and encouraged his work. Box 4 includes a miscellaneous folder regarding insane asylums and contains legal documents, postcard images, and receipts for services. Languages include English, German, French and Italian, and transcriptions or translations follow some of the documents.

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Charles M. Sheldon to Theodore W. Peers

Sheldon, Charles Monroe, 1857-1946

Charles M. Sheldon wrote to the Chairman of Trustees of the Central Congregational Church, Theodore W. Peers, accepting the position of pastor.

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Joseph McCoy

At the end of the Civil War when millions of longhorns were left on the plains of Texas without a market, the Union Pacific was building west across Kansas. Joseph McCoy, an Illinois stockman, believed these cattle could be herded north for shipment by rail. He built yards at Abilene and sent agents to notify the Texas cattlemen. In 1867 the first drives were made up the Chisholm Trail and during the next five years more than a million head were received.

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Richard West to John P. St. John

Richard West, a resident of Barton Station, Alabama, wrote this letter to Kansas governor St. John requesting information about available land in Kansas. West was a farmer who described in some detail many of the concerns facing emigrants, including transportation and other expenses. In addition to his role as governor of Kansas, St. John also served on the Board of Directors of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

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Dr. Brewster Higley

This is black and white photograph shows Dr. Brewster Highley, author of the song, "Home on the Range". It was officially recognized as the state song of Kansas on June 30, 1947.

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Chimes of E

Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902

This document is Henry Worrall's original manuscript copy of a solo guitar instrumental he called "Chimes of E." This piece is presumed to be an original composition or arrangement by Worrall. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular guitar instrumentals played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms. Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 where he died in 1902.

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Charles M. Sheldon and Central Congregational Church correspondence

Charles M. Sheldon (1857-1946) served as minister of the Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas from 1889 to 1920. He was also an author of the international best seller, In His Steps, which was published in 1897. A series of correspondence, presented here, is arranged in chronological order. A complete description of the entire collection is available through a link below. The correspondence consists of letters, postcards, cards, one notebook containing letters and newspaper clippings, and assorted personal items such as his self-portrait drawings. The majority of the correspondence consists of handwritten and typed letters to and from individuals, members or groups related to the Central Congregational Church, and organizations associated with his lifelong activities as a pastor and author, including Theo Peers, Ethel Peers, Anna Heartburg, Dorothy Heartburg, Helen T. Capps, Lida R. Hardy, May Flickinger, Charles Warren Helsley, Luther D. Whittemore, Hamilton Holt, Robert Thomson Jr., Norman J. Rimes, Lloyd George, James Wise, Arthur Capper, Michael I. Pupin, Alf M. Landon, Roy B. Guild, Arthur E. Hertzler, Samuel J. Crumbine, Wilbert E. Dull, M. de Arrude Camargo, Frank J. Warren, Beatrice Hoover, Samuel C. Spalding, H. T. Chase, Bishop Wise, The Emporia Gazette, Green Gables (the Dr. Benjamin F. Bailey Sanatorium), The Atlantic Monthly, The World?s Christian Endeavor Union, Plymouth Congregational Church, University of Illinois at Urbana Department of Physics, Abraham S. Hoyo, Harry Emerson Fosdick, International College in Turkey, Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America, Rollins College in Florida, The Topeka City Commission, Students? Christian Association of South Africa, Crosset & Dunlap Inc. Publishers in New York, Christian Herald Association, The Texas Herald, The Henry F. Henrichs Publications, Frankfort Rotary Club, and Notre-Dame de France/Jerusalem. There are letters involving other individuals, including Charles W. Helsley, Emma Crabb, H. J. Colburn, Robert Stone, Arthur G. Sellen, Henry F. Henrichs, Logan Shoop, Frank Jacobs, Hugh F. Mckean, Lee Braxton, Cady Hodge, Charles S. Lawrence, Elizabeth Turner Rawlings, Elisabeth Ebright, R. L. McNatt, Gale L. Beck, John H. Lehman, Helen Bradford, and Everett R. Daves. Charles W. Helsley was a minister at the Central Congregational Church after the passing of Charles M. Sheldon, and Emma Crabb was in charge of the Sheldon Collection at the Central Congregational Church.

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Henry Worrall with a plant grown in the great Arkansas Valley

Leonard & Martin

A photograph of Henry Worrall with a plant specimen grown in the Great Arkansas Valley. Besides being a musician and illustrator, Worrall was involved in promoting the agricultural potential of Kansas.

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H. Butterfield to Governor John A. Martin

H. Butterfield of Salem, Jewell County, Kansas, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka with a list of questions about the recently amended alcohol prohibition law regulating the sale of alcohol by druggists. Butterifeld asks whether any person can sign a prescription for alcohol, whether a druggist has a right to sell alcohol to someone the druggist knows will get drunk, what can be done when the county offices will not prosecute violations of the law, whether a minor has a right to a permit as a druggist to sell alcohol, and whether a billiard hall saloon that remains open on Sundays can be declared a nuisance and prosecuted under the law. Butterfield concludes by expressing his support for prohibition and asking for better enforcement of the law.

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