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Page 1 of 1, showing 7 records out of 7 total, starting on record 1, ending on 7

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Testimony of A. A. Harris, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus

A. A. Harris, a white resident of Ft. Scott, Kansas, gave this brief testimony on March 29, 1880, before the Senate select committee investigating the causes of the Exodus. Harris described his contact with the black Exodusters in his area, including their difficulty finding employment. The committee also asked Harris to speak in some detail about the general treatment of African-Americans in Kansas, including any discrimination against them, particularly in the world of politics. This committee was composed of three Democratic senators and two Republican senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio), William Windom (Rep., Minnesota), and Henry W. Blair (Rep., New Hampshire). Senators Blair and Vance asked the questions presented in this testimony.

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John Ritchie

This sepia colored carte-de-visite shows John Ritchie, (1817-1887), an abolitionist from Franklin, Indiana who moved, in 1855, to Topeka, Kansas. Actively involved in the Free State movement, Ritchie operated a way station along the underground railroad to help runway slaves. In 1858 and 1859 he respectively served as a delegate to the Leavenworth and Wyandotte Constitutional Conventions. Ritchie was also instrumental in donating a 160 acres of land for the future site of Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas.

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James Kelley

This is a photo of James "Dog" Kelley, former Confederate, buffalo hunter, saloon keeper and Mayor of Dodge City, Kansas. He is riding a horse and there are two dogs in the photo.

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Part 12: Exodusters, in first annual report of the Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics

Kansas Bureau of Labor

This excerpt of the Kansas Bureau of Labor report includes only Part 12, the portion of the report focusing on the Exodusters in Wyandotte, Kansas. The report includes transcribed testimonies of Exodusters as well as a detailed table showing statistics compiled from seventeen families, including their location, ages, health, and occupations. The report also includes a few references to Exodusters in Topeka.

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Elam Bartholomew diary

Bartholomew, Elam

Elam Bartholomew was a resident of Rooks County and Hays, Kansas. He was a horticulturalist, internationally known for his work with fungi. His diary reflects his active participation in Republican Party politics, local government, the United Presbyterian Church, farm organizations, and experimental farming. Elam Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874. He was born in Pennsylvania and his family moved to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873 he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery and returned to Illinois to marry her in June 1876. They returned to Kansas in September of 1876. The Bartholomews lived on their farm on Bow Creek until 1929 when they moved to Hays, where he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College. He died in 1934.

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Elam Bartholomew diary

Bartholomew, Elam

Elam Bartholomew was a resident of Rooks County and Hays, Kansas. He was a horticulturalist, internationally known for his work with fungi. His diary reflects his active participation in Republican Party politics, local government, the United Presbyterian Church, farm organizations, and experimental farming. Elam Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874. He was born in Pennsylvania and his family moved to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873 he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery and returned to Illinois to marry her in June 1876. They returned to Kansas in September of 1876. The Bartholomews lived on their farm on Bow Creek until 1929 when they moved to Hays, where he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College. He died in 1934.

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He doesn't like female mayors

In this newspaper article, the former city marshal of Argonia, Sumner County, Kansas, laments the election of Susanna Salter as mayor, saying that "female mayors are no good." In particular, he was frustrated that she asked him to close his poker room, and she also prevented the local druggist (pharmacist) from keeping alcoholic beverages in stock. He claims that "Mrs. Salter has just killed Argonia." Originally published in the Indianapolis Journal, Indianapolis, Indiana, the article was republished in the Meade County Globe, Meade, Kansas, on January 28, 1888.

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